Regal Home Inspection Is Infrared Certified!

Thermal Imaging Certified

Frank J. Delle Donne, owner and inspector at Regal Home Inspections, LLC has become certified by InterNACHI, the largest home inspector association, as a thermal imager. This requires taking and passing classes in Building Science and Thermal Imaging. This service will be rolled out this year as an ancillary service for home inspection clients or clients needing the specific analysis of thermal imaging.

What is thermal imaging? Thermal imaging is the use of specialized cameras that can look at the thermal (Heat and cool) properties of objects. A thermal imaging camera compares the thermal signatures of building surfaces comparing hot (or warmer) areas to cold (or cooler) areas. Then, using the training, a skilled thermographer can interpret the images that may identify moisture or poor insulation for example. In the photos below some examples show how the thermal imaging can identify or confirm electrical issues as well. Not all thermal imaging efforts are to identify issues. As shown below, thermal imaging can be used to confirm the operation of radiant heating in a ceiling or floor. The radiant heat is very subtle and not able to be distinguished with a laser thermometer, for example. But, as shown below, a thermal image can confirm the proper operation of a radiant heat system.

The thermal imaging service will be offered to home inspection clients at a steeply discounted rate or offered as a singular service for home or building owners. For more information call Frank at 908 902 2590.

This photo shows the heat of a light against the background of the cooler ceiling. Building anomalies such as moisture, poor insulation and electrical issues can be photographed in the infrared spectrum to identify issues that are not apparent to the naked eye.

 

There was a small stain on the kitchen ceiling, approximately 6 inches wide. The thermal image shows (the dark area in the photo) an area approximately 3 feet wide that’s wet from a bathroom leak above the kitchen ceiling.
Visually, an overheating wire can be seen.

 

The thermal image confirms that the circuit breaker and wire are warmer than the surrounding breakers and wires.

 

The thermal image camera can detect the heating coils for a radiant heat system. The coils can’t be seen with the naked eye but are in sharp focus with thermal imaging. This image is of the heating coils in the ceiling.
These two photos (above and below this caption) are of the radiant heating coils in the floor of a bathroom.

Marlboro Home Inspector | Home Inspection For Mansions | Regal Home INspection NJ

Gallery of Homes – 2018

2018 was another banner year. Thank you to all of those that hired me!  Here are a few examples of some of the homes inspected. They are listed in reverse chronological order.

Inspected November 6, 2018. Manalapan.
Inspected October 28, 2018. Lincroft.
Inspected October 18, 2018. Middletown.

 

Inspected October 11, 2018. Howell Township.
Inspected September 23, 2018. Millstone.
Inspected September 22, 2018. Fair Haven, NJ.
Inspected September 11, 2018. Colts Neck.
Inspected September 7, 2018. Colts Neck.
Inspected August, 28. Jackson, NJ.
Inspected August, 21. Brick, NJ
Inspected August 13, 2018. Wall Township.
Inspected July 8. Middletown.
Inspected July 2. Wall.
Inspected June 30. Toms River.
Inspected June 18. Lincroft.
Inspected June 4. Hazlet.
Inspected May 30. Colts Neck.
Inspected May 17. Little Silver.
Inspected May 7. Parlin.
Inspected April 5, 2018. Condominium unit in the Santander building. Asbury Park.
Inspected March 30, 2018. Townhouse. Aberdeen Township
Inspected March 24, 2018. Red Bank
Inspected March 15, 2018. Condominium. Middletown.
Inspected March 7, 2018. Wall Township.
Inspected 3/5/18. Monroe.
Inspected 3/3/18. Oceanport.
Inspected 2/26/18. Rumson.
Inspected 2/24/18. Hazlet.
Inspected 2/13/18. Jackson.
Inspected 2/9/18. Marlboro.

 

Inspected January 21. Holmdel.

 

 

Inspected January 18. Manchester.

 

Inspected January 3, 2018. Marlboro. Over 15,000 square feet.

Gallery of Homes Inspected – 2015

These houses were inspected by Regal Home Inspections, LLC in 2015. They are listed in reverse chronological order to the first inspection of the year on January 3, 2015 to the final inspection of the year on New Years Eve.

Inspected 12/31/15. Condominium. Union City. Built 2000.
Inspected 12/31/15. Condominium. Union City. Built 2000.
Inspected 12/22/15. Built 1988. Tinton Falls.
Inspected 12/22/15. Built 1988. Tinton Falls.
Inspected 12/21/15. Built 1990. Old Bridge.
Inspected 12/21/15. Built 1990. Old Bridge.
Inspected 12/21/15. Approximately 4000 square feet. Built 1999. Marlboro.
Inspected 12/21/15. Approximately 4000 square feet. Built 1999. Marlboro.
Inspected 12/19/15. Built 1986. Gated community, Freehold.
Inspected 12/19/15. Built 1986. Gated community, Freehold.
Inspected 12/14/15. Built 1955. Morganville.
Inspected 12/14/15. Built 1955. Morganville.
Inspected 12/11/15. Built 1958. Neptune City.
Inspected 12/11/15. Built 1958. Neptune City.
Inspected 12/11/15. Built 1940. South Amboy.
Inspected 12/11/15. Built 1940. South Amboy.
Inspected 12/6/15. Condo. Aberdeen.
Inspected 12/6/15. Condo. Aberdeen.
Inspected 12/4/15. Retirement community. Jackson.
Inspected 12/4/15. Retirement community. Jackson.
Inspected 12/2/15. Morganville. Townhouse built 1985.
Inspected 12/2/15. Morganville. Townhouse built 1985.
Inspected 11/30/15. South Amboy. 2 family house. Built 1962.
Inspected 11/30/15. South Amboy. 2 family house. Built 1962.
Inspected 11/23/15. Original section built 1953. Extensive expansion since then. Middletown.
Inspected 11/23/15. Original section built 1953. Extensive expansion since then. Middletown.
Inspected 11/23/15. Built 1970. Bayville.
Inspected 11/23/15. Built 1970. Bayville.
Inspected 11/21/15. Built 1909. Keyport.
Inspected 11/21/15. Built 1909. Keyport.
Inspected 11/20/15. Built 1966. Old Bridge.
Inspected 11/20/15. Built 1966. Old Bridge.
Inspected 11/18/15. Built 1972. Beachwood.
Inspected 11/18/15. Built 1972. Beachwood.
Inspected 11/17/15. Built 1956. Middletown.
Inspected 11/17/15. Built 1956. Middletown.
Inspected 11/16/15. Built 1984. Lincroft. Approximately 4000 square feet.
Inspected 11/16/15. Built 1984. Lincroft. Approximately 4000 square feet.
Inspected 11/13 & 14/2015. 10,000 square feet. Built 1904. Monmouth County.
Inspected 11/13 & 14/2015. 10,000 square feet. Six heating systems – 4 furnaces and 2 boilers. 21 rooms, 7 fireplaces. Built 1904. Monmouth County.
Inspected 11/11/15. Built 1965. Old Bridge.
Inspected 11/11/15. Built 1965. Old Bridge.
Inspected 11/6/15. Built 1956. Parlin.
Inspected 11/6/15. Built 1956. Parlin.
Inspected 11/5/15. Built 1996. Approximately 5600 square feet. Holmdel.
Inspected 11/5/15. Built 1996. Approximately 5600 square feet. Holmdel.
Inspected 10/31/15. Built 1973. Holmdel.
Inspected 10/31/15. Built 1973. Holmdel.
Inspected 10/30/15. Built 1989. Manalapan.
Inspected 10/30/15. Built 1989. Manalapan.
Inspected 10/27/15. Built 2004. Jackson.
Inspected 10/27/15. Built 2004. Jackson.
Inspected 10/24/15. Condominium. Long Branch.
Inspected 10/24/15. Condominium. Long Branch.
Inspected 10/23/15. Built 1994. Modular built home. Toms River.
Inspected 10/23/15. Built 1994. Modular built home. Toms River.
Inspected 10/22/15. Built 1971. Middletown.
Inspected 10/22/15. Built 1971. Middletown.
Inspected 10/19/15. Ocean Twp. Built 1973.
Inspected 10/19/15. Ocean Twp. Built 1973.
Inspected 10/11/15. Built 2013. Aberdeen.
Inspected 10/11/15. Built 2013. Aberdeen.
Inspected 10/11/15. Condo. Monmouth Beach.
Inspected 10/11/15. Condo. Monmouth Beach.
Inspected 10/8/15. Condo. Built 1982. Middletown.
Inspected 10/8/15. Condo. Built 1982. Middletown.
Inspected 10/8/15. Built 1998. Marlboro.
Inspected 10/8/15. Built 1998. Marlboro.
Inspected 10/7/15. Built 1983. Marlboro.
Inspected 10/7/15. Built 1983. Marlboro.
Inspected 10/7/15. Built 1973. Barnegat.
Inspected 10/7/15. Built 1973. Barnegat.
Inspected 10/5/15. Built 1929. Little Silver.
Inspected 10/5/15. Built 1929. Little Silver.
DSCF9714-400
Inspected 10/2/15. Built circa 1910. Englishtown.
Inspected 10/1/15. Condo. Secaucus.
Inspected 10/1/15. Condo. Secaucus.
Inspected 9/30/15. New construction. Highlands.
Inspected 9/30/15. New construction. Highlands.
Inspected 9/29/15. Built 1968. Edison.
Inspected 9/29/15. Built 1968. Edison.
Inspected 9/28/15. Built 1988. Approximately 6000 square feet. Holmdel.
Inspected 9/28/15. Built 1988. Approximately 6000 square feet. Holmdel.
Inspected 9/23/15. Built 1940. Farmingdale.
Inspected 9/23/15. Built 1940. Farmingdale.
DSCF7989-400
Inspected 9/21/15. Built 1933. Keansburg.
Inspected 9/17/15. Howell. Built 1958.
Inspected 9/17/15. Howell. Built 1958.
Inspected 9/16/15. Built 1950. Monmouth County.
Inspected 9/16/15. Built 1950. Little Silver.
Inspected 9/15/15. Built 1999. Mother/Daughter. Jackson.
Inspected 9/15/15. Built 1999. Mother/Daughter. Jackson.
Inspected 9/11/15. Condo. Asbury Park. Building built 1930. Renovations circa 2006.
Inspected 9/11/15. Condo. Asbury Park. Building built 1930. Renovations circa 2006.
DSCF6311-400
Inspected 9/10/15. Marlboro. Built 1989. Approximately 6000 square feet.
DSCF6089-400
Inspected 9/9/15. Built 1958. Parlin.
Inspected 9/6/15. Built 1993. Manalapan. Approximately 4500 square feet.
Inspected 9/6/15. Built 1993. Manalapan. Approximately 4500 square feet.
Inspected 9/4/15. Built 1992. Retirement community. Toms River.
Inspected 9/4/15. Built 1992. Retirement community. Toms River.
Inspected 9/3/15. Built 1963. Hazlet.
Inspected 9/3/15. Built 1963. Hazlet.
Inspected 9/3/15. Built 1999. Robbinsville.
Inspected 9/3/15. Built 1999. Robbinsville.
Inspected 9/3/15. Townhouse. Jackson. Built 2006.
Inspected 9/3/15. Townhouse. Jackson. Built 2006.
DSCF4683-400
Inspected 9/1/15. Middletown. Mother/daughter. Build circa 1983.
Inspected 9/1/15. Retirement community. Jackson. Built 2006.
Inspected 9/1/15. Retirement community. Jackson. Built 2006.
DSCF4258-400
Inspected 8/31/15. Brick. Built 1990.
Inspected 8/24/15. Built 1970. Morganville.
Inspected 8/24/15. Built 1970. Morganville.
Inspected 8/22/15. Built 2005. Manahawkin.
Inspected 8/22/15. Built 2005. Manahawkin.
Inspected 8/21/15. Millstone. Built 1970. Approximately 4500 square feet.
Inspected 8/21/15. Millstone. Built 1997. Approximately 4500 square feet.
Inspected 8/20/15. Built 1910. Keyport.
Inspected 8/20/15. Built 1910. Keyport.
Inspected 8/20/15. Built 1998. Tinton Falls.
Inspected 8/20/15. Built 1998. Tinton Falls.
Inspected 8/19/15. Approximately 5000 square foot home. Morganville.
Inspected 8/19/15. Approximately 5000 square foot home. Built 1985.  Morganville.
Inspected house and pool. 8/15/15. Built 1965. Howell.
Inspected house and pool. 8/15/15. Built 1965. Howell.
Inspected 8/14/15. Built 1936. Spotswood.
Inspected 8/14/15. Built 1936. New Egypt.

 

Inspected 8/14/15. Condo. Spotswood.
Inspected 8/14/15. Condo. Spotswood.
Inspected 8/13/15. Built 2013. Manalapan.
Inspected 8/13/15. Built 2013. Manalapan. Retirement community.
Inspected 8/11/15. Colts Neck. Built 1997. Approximately 5500 square feet.
Inspected 8/11/15. Colts Neck. Built 1997. Approximately 5500 square feet.
Inspected 8/10/15. Middletown. Built 1976.
Inspected 8/10/15. Middletown. Built 1976.
Inspected 8/7/15. Built 2004. Jackson
Inspected 8/7/15. Built 2004. Jackson. Retirement community.

 

Inspected 8/7/15. Built 1978. Howell.
Inspected 8/7/15. Built 1978. Howell.
Inspected 8/6/15. Union Beach. Built 2014.
Inspected 8/6/15. Union Beach. Built 2014.
Inspected 8/5/15. Approximately 4500 square feet. Built 2006. Middletown.
Inspected 8/5/15. Approximately 4500 square feet. Built 2006. Middletown.
Inspected 8/5/15. Townhouse built 2014. Tinton Falls
Inspected 8/5/15. Townhouse built 2014. Tinton Falls
Inspected 8/4/15. Parlin. Built 1972.
Inspected 8/4/15. Parlin. Built 1972.
Inspected 8/3/15. Built 2005. Lavallette.
Inspected 8/3/15. Built 2005. Lavallette.
Inspected 7/31/15. Keyport.
Inspected 7/31/15. Keyport.
Inspected 7/31/15. Monmouth County. Originally built 1948. Rebuilt 2013.
Inspected 7/31/15. Monmouth County. Originally built 1948. Rebuilt 2013.
Inspected 7/30/15. Condo. Matawan.
Inspected 7/30/15. Condo. Matawan.
Inspected 7/29/15. Parlin. Built 1970.
Inspected 7/29/15. Parlin. Built 1970.

Toms_River_NJ_Home_Inspection_rhinj

Inspected 7/23/15. Aberdeen. Condo. Built 1984.
Inspected 7/23/15. Aberdeen. Condo. Built 1984.
Inspected 7/22/15. Parlin. Built 2004.
Inspected 7/22/15. Parlin. Built 2004. Retirement community.
Inspected 7/21/15. Townhouse. Old Bridge. Built 1980.
Inspected 7/21/15. Townhouse. Old Bridge. Built 1980.
Inspected 7/20/15. New construction. Toms River.
Inspected 7/20/15. New construction. Toms River. Approximately 3000 square feet.
Inspected Sunday, 7/19/15. Built 2009. Berkeley Township, Ocean County.
Inspected Sunday, 7/19/15. Built 2009. Berkeley Township, Ocean County.
Inspected 7/14/15. Built 2009. Ocean County.
Inspected 7/14/15. Built 2009. Ocean County.
Inspected 7/11/15. Built 1965. Approximately 4000 square feet. Holmdel, NJ.
Inspected 7/11/15. Built 1965. Approximately 4000 square feet. Holmdel, NJ.
Inspected 7/10/15. Built 1973. Gated, retirement community in Monroe.
Inspected 7/10/15. Built 1973. Gated, retirement community in Monroe.
Inspected 7/8/15. Built 1952. Monmouth County.
Inspected 7/8/15. Built 1952. Monmouth County.
Inspected 7/8/15. Old Bridge. Built 1984.
Inspected 7/8/15. Old Bridge. Built 1984.
Inspected 7/7/15. Built 1942. Keyport.
Inspected 7/7/15. Built 1942. Keyport.
Inspected 7/6/15. Built 2002. Approx. 4000 square feet.
Inspected 7/6/15. Built 2002. Approx. 4000 square feet.
Inspected 7/3/15. Built 1984. Marlboro.
Inspected 7/3/15. Built 1984. Marlboro.
Inspected 7/2/15. Built 1978.
Inspected 7/2/15. Built 1978. Franklin Twp., Somerset County.
Inspected 6/27/15. 5000+ square foot house. 3&1/2 bathrooms. Built 2007.
Inspected 6/27/15. 5000+ square foot house. 3&1/2 bathrooms. Built 2007.
Inspected 6/24/15. Three apartment building. Recently elevated for flood compliance. Union Beach.
Inspected 6/24/15. Three apartment building. Recently elevated for flood compliance. Union Beach.
Inspected 6/19/15. Built 1967. Monroe Twp.
Inspected 6/19/15. Built 1967. Monroe Twp.
Inspected 6/16/15. Sayreville. Built 1960s.
Inspected 6/16/15. Sayreville. Built 1960s.
Inspected 6/16/15. Townhouse. Tinton Falls. Built 1988.
Inspected 6/16/15. Townhouse. Tinton Falls. Built 1988.
Inspected 6/13/15. Built 1971. Old Bridge
Inspected 6/13/15. Built 1971. Old Bridge
Inspected 6/12/15. Built 2006. Brick
Inspected 6/12/15. Built 2006. Brick
Inspected 6/11/15. Approximately 6000 square feet. 4.5 Bathrooms. Holmdel
Inspected 6/11/15. Approximately 6000 square feet. 4.5 Bathrooms. Holmdel
Inspected 6/10/15. 3rd floor condo with 2 car garage. Built 2012.
Inspected 6/10/15. 3rd floor condo with 2 car garage. Built 2012. Retirement community.
Inspected 6/8/15. Built 1963. Jackson, NJ.
Inspected 6/8/15. Built 1963. Jackson, NJ.
Inspected 6/8/15. Townhouse. Monmouth County. Built 2012.
Inspected 6/8/15. Townhouse. Monmouth County. Built 2012.
Inspected 6/7/15. Rumson, NJ. Original house built circa 1920.
Inspected 6/7/15. Rumson, NJ. Original house built circa 1920.
Inspected 6/5/15. Built 1931. Solid brick with clay siding! Middlesex County.
Inspected 6/5/15. Built 1931. Solid brick with clay siding! Middlesex County.
Inspected 6/4/15. Built 1985. Jackson. Two family.
Inspected 6/4/15. Built 1985. Jackson. Two family.
Inspected 6/3/15. Rumson. Built circa 1900 with significant upgrades in 1988.
Inspected 6/3/15. Rumson. Built circa 1900 with significant upgrades in 1988.
Inspected 6/3/15. Manchester. Built 1974.
Inspected 6/3/15. Manchester. Built 1974. Retirement community.

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Inspected 5/31/15. Approximately 3250 square feet. Built 2004. Monmouth County.
Inspected 5/31/15. Approximately 3250 square feet. Built 2004. Monmouth County.
Inspected 5/30/15. Approximately 3500 square foot home. Built 1977. Monmouth County.
Inspected 5/30/15. Approximately 3500 square foot home. Built 1977. Monmouth County.
Inspected 5/26/15. Built 1991. Approximately 3000 square feet. Monmouth County, NJ.
Inspected 5/26/15. Built 1991. Approximately 3000 square feet. Monmouth County, NJ.
Inspected 5/26/15. Cape Cod style home. Built 1950. Monmouth County, NJ.
Inspected 5/26/15. Cape Cod style home. Built 1950. Monmouth County, NJ.
Inspected house and pool 5/22/15. Built 1963,
Inspected house and pool 5/22/15. Built 1963. Mercer County
Inspected 5/20/15. Approximately 3000 square feet. 3 & 1/2 bathrooms. Morganville, NJ.
Inspected 5/20/15. Approximately 3000 square feet. 3 & 1/2 bathrooms. Morganville, NJ.
Inspected 5/19/15. Approximately 3500 square feet. 4 & 1/2 baths. Marlboro, NJ.
Inspected 5/19/15. Approximately 3500 square feet. 4 & 1/2 baths. Marlboro, NJ.
Inspected 5/13/15. Built 1972. Monmouth County.
Inspected 5/13/15. Built 1972. Monmouth County.
Inspected 5/8/15. Built 1998. Monmouth County, NJ. Approximately 3500 square feet.
Inspected 5/8/15. Built 1998. Monmouth County, NJ. Approximately 3500 square feet.
Inspected 5/5/15. Edison, NJ. Middlesex County. Built 1947.
Inspected 5/5/15. Edison, NJ. Middlesex County. Built 1947.
Inspected 5/5/15. Two bedroom condo. River Vale, Bergen County, NJ. Built 1970.
Inspected 5/5/15. Two bedroom condo. River Vale, Bergen County, NJ. Built 1970.
Inspected 5/2/15. Aberdeen, NJ. Built 1961.
Inspected 5/2/15. Aberdeen, NJ. Built 1961.
Inspected 5/1/15. New Providence, NJ. Built 1962.
Inspected 5/1/15. New Providence, NJ. Built 1962.
Inspected 5/1/15. Townhouse. Holmdel, NJ. Built 1984.
Inspected 5/1/15. Townhouse. Holmdel, NJ. Built 1984.
Inspected 4/27/15. 2 bedroom, 2 bath condo. Aberdeen, NJ. Built 1979.
Inspected 4/27/15. 2 bedroom, 2 bath condo. Aberdeen, NJ. Built 1979.
Inspected 4/25/15. Built 1984. Brick, NJ.
Inspected 4/25/15. Built 1984. Brick, NJ.
Inspected 4/24/15. Three apartments. Union Beach. Built 1945.
Inspected 4/24/15. Three apartments. Union Beach. Built 1945.
Inspected 4/2/15. Built 1965. Parlin, NJ.
Inspected 4/22/15. Built 1965. Parlin, NJ.
Inspected 4/22/15. Built 1969. Freehold, NJ.
Inspected 4/22/15. Built 1969. Freehold, NJ.
Inspected 4/19/15. Built 1968. Marlboro, NJ
Inspected 4/19/15. Built 1968. Marlboro, NJ
New_Egypt_NJ_Home_Inspection_rhinj
Inspected 4/18/15. Built 1972. New Egypt, NJ
Inspected 4/17/15. Built 1893. Aberdeen, NJ
Inspected 4/17/15. Built 1893. Aberdeen, NJ
Inspected 4/14/15. Built 1973. Holmdel, NJ.
Inspected 4/14/15. Built 1973. Holmdel, NJ.
Inspected 4/14/15. East Brunswick, NJ. Built 1956.
Inspected 4/14/15. East Brunswick, NJ. Built 1956.
Inspected 4/13/15. Built 1956. Parlin, NJ
Inspected 4/13/15. Built 1956. Parlin, NJ
Inspected 4/10/15. Built 1926. Monmouth County.
Inspected 4/10/15. Built 1926. Monmouth County.
Inspected 4/9/15. Townhouse. Freehold, NJ. Built 1975.
Inspected 4/9/15. Townhouse. Freehold, NJ. Built 1975.
Inspected 4/6/15. Built 1936. Woodbridge, NJ
Inspected 4/6/15. Built 1936. Woodbridge, NJ
Inspected 4/6/15. 2 bedroom, 2 bath condo, Monmouth Beach, NJ
Inspected 4/6/15. 2 bedroom, 2 bath condo, Monmouth Beach, NJ
Inspected 4/4/15. Built 1963. Colts Neck
Inspected 4/4/15. Built 1963. Colts Neck
Inspected 4/4/15. 5000+ square feet. Monmouth County.
Inspected 4/4/15. 5000+ square feet. Built 1998. Monmouth County.
Inspected 4/3/15. Built 1938. Keansburg
Inspected 4/3/15. Built 1938. Keansburg
Inspected 4/2/15. Built 1969. Colts Neck.
Inspected 4/2/15. Built 1969. Colts Neck.
Inspected 3/26/15. 3 apartments. Jersey City. Built 1895.
Inspected 3/26/15. 3 apartments. Jersey City. Built 1895.
Inspected 3/25/15. Townhouse. Monmouth County.
Inspected 3/25/15. Townhouse. Monmouth County.
Brick_NJ_Inspection_rhinj
Inspected 3/24/15. Condo. Brick, NJ. Built 1984.

 

Inspected 3/23/2015. Single family attached. Built 1998. Monroe, NJ. Approximately 1300 square feet. 2 bed, 2 bath.
Inspected 3/23/2015. Single family attached. Built 1998. Monroe. Retirement community.
Inspected 3/18/15. Eatontown, NJ. Approximately 3000 square feet with addition. Originally built 1951.
Inspected 3/18/15. Eatontown, NJ. Approximately 3000 square feet with addition. Originally built 1951.
Inspected 3/16/15. Monmouth County. 4900 square feet. Mother/Daughter. Built 1986.
Inspected 3/16/15. Monmouth County. 4900 square feet. Mother/Daughter. Built 1986.
Inspected 3/14/15. Condo. Red Bank, NJ
Inspected 3/14/15. Condo. Red Bank, NJ
Inspected 3/13/15. Glen Rock, NJ. Approximately 3500 square feet. Built 1930.
Inspected 3/13/15. Glen Rock, NJ. Approximately 3500 square feet. Built 1930.
Inspected 3/2/15. Approximately 4000 square ft. Built 2003. Monmouth County.
Inspected 3/2/15. Approximately 4000 square ft. Built 2003. Monmouth County.
Old_Bridge_NJ_Inspection_rhinj.jpg
Inspected 2/28/15. 2000 square foot colonial built 1985. Old Bridge, NJ.

 

Inspected 2/27/15. Approximately 4000 square feet. Built 2000. Monmouth County.
Inspected 2/27/15. Approximately 4000 square feet. Built 2000. Monmouth County.

 

Inspected 2/24/15. Approximately 3000 sq. ft. Built 1969. Monmouth County.
Inspected 2/24/15. Built 1969. Monmouth County.

 

Inspected 2/21/15. 2 bedroom 1 bath condo. Monmouth County.
Inspected 2/21/15. 2 bedroom 1 bath condo. Monmouth County. Built 1982.

 

Inspected 2/19/15. Built 1987. Approx 3000 sq. ft. Norristown, PA.
Inspected 2/19/15. Built 1987. Approx. 3000 sq. ft. Norristown, PA.

 

Inspected 2-16-15. Built 1910. Remodeled 2006. Monmouth County.
Inspected 2/16/15. Built 1910. 3500 square feet. Remodeled 2006. Monmouth County.

 

Inspected 2/13/15. Townhouse. Built 1989. Manalapan, NJ.
Inspected 2/13/15. Townhouse. Built 1989. Manalapan, NJ.

 

Inspected 2/13/15. Manchester, NJ. Built 2009.
Inspected 2/13/15. Manchester, NJ. Built 2009. Retirement community.

 

Inspected 2/12/15. Bayville, NJ. Built 2000.
Inspected 2/12/15. Bayville, NJ. Built 2000.

 

South River, NJ. Inspected 2/12/15. Built 1951.
South River, NJ. Inspected 2/12/15. Built 1951.
Inspected 2/4/15. Edison, NJ. 2800 Sq. ft. home. Built 2002.
Inspected 2/4/15. Edison, NJ. 2800 Sq. ft. home. Built 2002.

 

 

Inspected 1/22/15. Built 1967. Monmouth County.
Inspected 1/22/15. Built 1967. Colts Neck, NJ.

 

Inspected 1/16/15. Built 1962. Lavallette, NJ.
Inspected 1/16/15. Built 1962. Lavallette, NJ.

 

Inspected 1/11/2015. Ocean County, NJ.
Inspected 1/11/2015. Ocean County. Built 1979.

 

Inspected 1/9/2015. Built 1979. Ocean County, NJ.
Inspected 1/9/2015. Built 1963. Ocean County.

 

2 family house. Built 1910. Kearny, NJ.
Inspected 1/8/2015. Two family house. Built 1910. Kearny, NJ.

 

Inspected 1/6/2015. Approx. 3000 sq ft.
Inspected 1/6/2015. Approx. 3000 sq. ft. Built 1994. Ocean County.

 

Inspected 1/5/2015. Original house (stone structure) built in 1740. The left side was built in the 1800s.
Inspected 1/5/2015. Original house (stone structure) built in 1740. The left side was built in the 1800s. Hunterdon County.

 

Inspected 1/3/15 - 5000+ sq. ft. house. 6.5 baths.
Inspected 1/3/15 – 5000+ sq. ft. house. 6.5 baths. Built 1988. Monmouth County.

Maintaining Your Home – Part 2; Help The Sale Go Smoothly

Maintaining Your Home – Part 2

Help the Sale Go Smoothly

Findings of a Home Inspector

By Frank J. Delle Donne, Licensed Home Inspector

July 11, 2014

For most people, purchasing a house is the largest purchase they have thus far made. Help ensure that you, “Buy with confidence. Sell with pride” ® by using Regal Home Inspections, LLC.

Please leave a review of this article or of our services.   Click Here and then click on, “Write a Review”.

Reading this article will not guarantee that you will sell your home. It offers observations of issues found in homes both new and old. However, older homes usually contain more issues. 

If you are planning to sell your home and would like to have a Seller’s Inspection conducted please call Regal Home Inspections, LLC. We can perform a thorough inspection and make recommendations that should help any buyer feel more comfortable in making an offer.   We can perform a New Jersey Administrative Code (NJAC) compliant home inspection. We can conduct a radon test and have your house professionally inspected for termites and Wood Destroying Insects and Wood Destroying Organisms (WDI/WDO). We can also conduct pool inspections. If issues are found we can help facilitate additional levels of expertise. All in an attempt so that your home, a small cape cod or a country estate, will be better prepared for the eventual buyer’s inspection and closing.

Introduction

In the first part of this two part series I tried to introduce the reader to some not-so-obvious maintenance issues that I have found during my home inspections. The reason they are important is because they are safety related and some are objectively deemed to be Material (aka Major) Defects. This article looks at a few others. The goal here is that possibly sellers will read this, consider their home and either perform a more thorough inspection on their own or, better yet, hire Regal Home Inspections, LLC to perform a Seller’s Inspection so that when it comes time for the buyer’s inspector to come through, many of the issues may have been addressed already. There are two ways that a seller can benefit from a Seller’s Inspection performed by Regal Home Inspections, LLC. First, the seller can use the findings to make corrections and/or repairs. Second, the seller can always include those items found in the Seller’s Inspection in the Seller’s Disclosure. I find that home sales hit snags when things are found by the buyer’s inspector that weren’t previously known by the seller or the seller knew but was hoping the inspector wouldn’t find. Quite the roll of the dice for all parties.

Brief Review (This section is repeated from the initial article)

The NJAC has many requirements of an inspector. However, when it comes to the actual inspection and the reporting there are a few key points. The NJAC follows the Standards of Practice of the American Society of Home Inspectors (ASHI). When it comes to the inspection, the inspector is required by law to DESCRIBE specific systems and components of the house; Plumbing, electrical, exterior, etc. The inspector is required to IDENTIFY any Material (aka Major) Defects; Findings that effect the habitability, safety or value of the home (in very simplified terms here). And the inspector is required to PREPARE a written report memorializing the previously mentioned elements.

What the inspector is not doing is determining if the curtains match the rug. If the choice of siding materials matches or clashes with the general theme of the other houses. We are looking for very specific things that are not otherwise apparent to the buyer or the seller and for this reason, it’s a very good idea for the seller to be as prepared as best as possible. You painted the walls so they look fresh, right? You had the grass fertilized and the bushes trimmed so the yard has curb appeal, right? Maybe you’ve even put some chocolate chip cookies in the oven to make the house smell good for that open house?

Preparing Your House

Does anybody decide on a Monday, out of the clear blue, that they are going to list and try to sell their home that day? Isn’t it more reasonable that people know in advance that they will be selling their home? It may not be known years in advance but a month, maybe two at least. “Honey, maybe we should plan on selling our home when we retire next year?” Or perhaps, “I just got offered a new job at work but it requires a relocation. The company wants me to move to California in 2 months.” My wife and I have been in our current home for almost 22 years with no plans to leave…yet. However, when we moved into our previous home in April, 1987, we knew that in the summer of 1991 (over 4 years later) we would be moving again. We used the summer when our oldest child would be between kindergarten and 1st grade as the target. I am not kidding when I say that we knew at the house closing in 1987 that between the end of June and early September, 1991, we’d be making another move.

Literally, the day before my son started 1st grade on September 5, 1991, we moved into our current home. That 1st grader is now 29 years old!

Sure there are exceptions. Parents pass away suddenly and the home has to be sold as part of an estate is one example and there are others. The point is that in the majority of situations planning can occur and fixing inspection related issues should be high on the priority list. Especially for estate sales!

According to the Consumer Product Safety Commission, Ground Fault Circuit Interrupt (GFCI) outlets are currently required in any outdoor outlet, kitchens, bathrooms, laundry rooms, garages, unfinished basements and elsewhere. A home inspector must look for and test GFCI outlets. GFCI outlets (and GFCI protected circuits) protect people from stray electrical current that they may inadvertently come in contact with. Electricity wants to follow the path of least resistance to ground. When people are struck by lightning, they accidentally become the path of least resistance to ground for that lightning bolt. If there is a damaged electrical circuit in the kitchen, bath or elsewhere, a person may accidentally become the path of least resistance to ground. A GFCI outlet or circuit can detect that unintentional path and in a tiny fraction of a second, the GFCI shuts the electricity off.

When I am inspecting a house I provide the client with information that shows, for example, that GFCI outlets haven’t been required in kitchens since 1987.   I inspected a house last week that was built in 1977. Before I went inside the house I provided information to the client and stated, we may not find GFCI in the kitchen…and we didn’t. It’s a Safety item on the report.   This sale may not go through because the GFCI are one item on a not too long list of things that need to be fixed. It’s an estate sale with, “who gives a damn” sellers that just want their money.

Does your house have a door between the attached garage and the living area? If it does, is the garage door solid core or metal? Is it fire-rated? Does the garage door have a mechanism (spring loaded hinges or other device) that AUTOMATICALLY closes and latches the door between the garage and living area? Spring loaded hinges cost about $10 each at Home Depot or Lowes. Don’t have a fire rated door or it doesn’t automatically close and latch? It’s a Material Defect related to SAFETY.

How close does the soil get to your siding? In a wood framed house you have the foundation wall and then the wood frame sits on top of that. The siding, let’s assume vinyl, covers the wood framing and exterior wood sheathing. It’s not a Material Defect or a Safety item but the inspector will recommend that there is at least 6 inches of space between the top of the soil and the bottom of the siding and wood framing. Does a buyer want to close on a new house and then spend the next couple of weekends digging and raking the dirt away from the house? I’d bet the answer is a resounding, “NO”. If you’re planning to sell, hire a landscaper and pay them some money to re-grade your yard so that you can see 6 inches of concrete foundation between the top of the soil and the siding. Do you know why it’s important? Let me put it to you this way. If the soil comes to the siding and framing, the inspector will tell the buyer that the condition makes it easy (conducive) for termites to go from the soil to the wood. Do you know what the buyer thinks? They think, “if I buy this house I’ll have termites!” All they will remember is, TERMITES! An associated aspect to this is if you are planning to sell, get a termite inspection and treatment. Have the pesticide company give you a certificate and share that with the buyers. Turn a potential negative into a positive.

Conclusion

I have just shared three inspection issues that are A) Relatively easy to fix and B) Can scare the heck out of a buyer and chase them away. Regardless if you are buying or selling a home, it is a significant transaction either way. Buy with confidence and sell with pride by having Regal Home Inspections, LLC conduct your inspection. We look for things that you probably never considered. That’s why we can help you avoid issues and delays in closing when the buyer and seller are of different minds on whom should address inspection item A, B or C. We can help get some of them out of the way for the seller or help the buyer identify issues that may not be obvious.

Regal Home Inspections, LLC starts every inspection with the presentation of a folio of information for the client. That folio includes general information but also includes a written introduction to the inspection. I present an initial overview of the main elements detailed in this article; Laws that govern the inspection process, areas that will be inspected and more. I believe this is unique to the service that Regal Home Inspections, LLC provides.

I would appreciate your comments about this article. Please email your comments to frank07722@gmail.com

About the author. I am a NJ Licensed Home Inspector. I am the owner and Inspector at Regal Home Inspections, LLC. In addition to being a New Jersey Licensed Home Inspector I am also a NJ-DEP certified Radon Measurement Technician and Regal Home Inspections, LLC has also collected samples for lead paint, allergens and mold. We are affiliated with the state’s best labs that perform the sample evaluation and testing. We can also help facilitate the testing of septic system and numerous aspects of oil tank evaluations. This includes oil tank integrity testing, tank locate services and soil samples. We work to ensure that the house you’re buying is sound or that you know of any issues.

Maintain Your Home. Findings of a Home Inspector.

Maintaining Your Home

Help the Sale Go Smoothly

Findings of a Home Inspector

By Frank J. Delle Donne, Licensed Home Inspector

June 17, 2014

For most people, purchasing a house is the largest purchase they have thus far made. Help ensure that you, “Buy with confidence. Sell with pride” ® by using Regal Home Inspections, LLC.

Please leave a review of this article or of our services.   Click Here and then click on, “Write a Review”.

Reading this article will not guarantee that you will sell your home. It offers observations of issues found in homes both new and old. However, older homes usually contain more issues.

If you are planning to sell your home and would like to have a Seller’s Inspection conducted please call Regal Home Inspections, LLC. We can perform a thorough inspection and make recommendations that should help any buyer feel more comfortable in making an offer.   We can perform a New Jersey Administrative Code (NJAC) compliant home inspection. We can conduct a radon test and have your house professionally inspected for termites and Wood Destroying Insects and Wood Destroying Organisms (WDI/WDO). We can also conduct pool inspections. If issues are found we can help facilitate additional levels of expertise. All in an attempt so that your home, a small cape cod or a country estate, will be better prepared for the eventual buyer’s inspection and closing!

Introduction

I have inspected homes of various ages, sizes and in different geographies; Bergen County to Ocean County. Some have been urban and some suburban. From 1200 square feet to approximately 8000 square feet. From 1 furnace and no air conditioners to a single home with four furnaces and 5 air conditioners.

Regardless of the age, size, price or location there have been inspection related issues found with nearly every inspection I have performed. In this article I will share some examples because they are probably not the type that the seller has ever considered. Some are easy to prepare for. Some not as easy and you should be prepared. It’s when the seller is unprepared and the item is deemed to be significant* that there’s potential for contention. * Significant is subjective when it comes to the buyer. Items of note should not be subjective for the inspector but one never knows how the buyer will judge an issue. Some examples are in the article.

Brief Review

The NJAC has many requirements of an inspector. However, when it comes to the actual inspection and the reporting there are a few key points. The NJAC follows the Standards of Practice of the American Society of Home Inspectors (ASHI). When it comes to the inspection, the inspector is required by law to DESCRIBE specific systems and components of the house; Plumbing, electrical, exterior, etc. The inspector is required to IDENTIFY any Material (aka Major) Defects; Findings that effect the habitability, safety or value of the home (in very simplified terms here). And the inspector is required to PREPARE a written report memorializing the previously mentioned elements.

What the inspector is not doing is determining if the curtains match the rug. If the choice of siding materials matches or clashes with the general theme of the other houses. We are looking for very specific things that are not otherwise apparent to the buyer or the seller and for this reason, it’s a very good idea for the seller to be as prepared as best as possible. You painted the walls so they look fresh, right? You had the grass fertilized and the bushes trimmed so the yard has curb appeal, right? Maybe you’ve even put some chocolate chip cookies in the oven to make the house smell good for that open house?

But did you think about:

  1. Having your furnace or air conditioner serviced?
  2. Checking to make sure your electrical system was up to date?
  3. Did you check to make sure there aren’t any leaks under any of your sinks?
  4. Did you check to make sure your dryer vent is clean and relatively lint free?

The inspector will go even further. Let’s look at some examples.

  1. How old is your garage door and garage door opener? Since 1993 garage doors have to have entrapment protection mechanisms. In fact the NJAC REQUIRES that they inspector check for functioning garage door entrapment protection mechanisms.   Furthermore, if they are not functioning properly, this is classified as a SAFETY issue (remember the Material Defect definition in the NJAC? I paraphrased above but SAFETY issues are included).
  2. Do you know what the difference between a guardrail and a handrail on a set of steps? The inspector better and if there isn’t either where they should be that too is a SAFETY issue. On a related note, do you know how far apart the spindles of a guardrail should be? If they are too far apart this is a SAFETY issue.
  3. While we’re on the general subject of steps and stairs, do you know how high a step’s riser (the vertical part) can be? How about the minimum depth for the tread (the part where your foot goes) before it too is a SAFETY issue?
  4. Your water heater and air conditioner are working fine, right? As a home inspector part of our inspection process is to determine how old some of the major appliances are. When I mention, “Major appliance” I am referring to water heaters, furnaces and central air conditioners, not microwaves as an example. If you, as the seller, don’t have receipts or records of when the water heater, furnace or air conditioner was purchased, the inspector can almost always determine the manufacture date from the serial number. Different manufacturers code the date differently but it’s almost always there. Sometimes the year is coded to a letter or the year is abbreviated; “0803” for manufacture the 8th week if 2003 or C99 where the “C”, 3rd letter in the alphabet corresponds to March and the “99” is 1999. What’s my point? If the water heater, AC or furnace is too old it may be flagged as a Material (aka Major) Defect. It’s not subjective but it’s objective. If a water heater is 20 years old, it is well past its typical useful life and every day that it continues to work is a gift. The buyer is being told by the inspector that they should have no (zip, zero, nada) expectation that the 20 year old water heater will work another day and therefore, the “value” of that NJAC required system or component is practically $0 but there is an expectation that the house’s price includes a working, functioning and reasonably reliable water heater. The seller thinks it is but the inspector will use the facts to determine that it is not.

Here are a couple that aren’t as obvious.

  1. For a single family home or townhome, there is often an attic. A space above the regular living area but below the surface of the roof. The science behind most attic designs is that the air inside the attic should be the same temperature as the outside temperature. In the summer it’s tough to keep the attic at 90 degrees on a day when it’s 90 degrees and sunny out but in the winter, when it’s 5 degrees outside, the attic science says that the air temperature in the attic should also be 5 degrees. Why? Well, if the air in the attic is 50 degrees when it’s 5 degrees outside, where might that heat source be coming from? Some may be the sun load but most is probably heat leaking from inside the house’s living space into the unheated attic. Do you pay to heat your attic when there’s no one living or sleeping there? I don’t. Secondly, when the roof is snow covered, if it gets too warm inside the attic the snow on the roof will melt and the water will freeze. The water will make its way up under the roof shingles and then freeze. Constant freeze thaw cycles will shorten the life of your roof surface. I just had my roof replaced at my home. The manufacturer’s warranty states that the warranty does not cover damage due to, “Inadequate ventilation”. Inadequate ventilation will cause the roof surface and the sheathing (plywood) below to get way too hot in summer and the freeze damage mentioned in winter. Proper ventilation helps in all seasons.
  2. I’ve had this come up twice in the last few weeks. A situation that I don’t believe any homeowner would notice but one that will be identified as a SAFETY issue on an inspection report. Many homes have had old oil furnaces replaced with newer gas furnaces. Perhaps the water heater too. I came across this situation this week. A couple of weeks ago I saw an old wood burning fireplace converted to a gas fireplace. The old designs for both these houses had oil or wood appliances and properly designed and sized flue pipes were originally built. The clay flue pipes inside the chimneys were built to a height that allowed the hot (oil or wood) exhaust to rise up the flue and exit the chimney where the vapors cooled. Please note that the exhaust is very caustic and when it cools it condenses into water which is also, caustic.   Comparatively, believe it or not, gas appliance exhaust isn’t as hot as oil exhaust or wood smoke.

When the gas exhaust enters the clay flue in the original chimney, since the gas doesn’t start out as hot, it actually cools and condenses before it leaves the clay flue pipe. The caustic materials in the gas have now attached, mixed with water, inside the clay flue pipe. Over time this caustic water can corrode the clay, the mortar connection clay sections and the mortar and brick of the chimney’s structure.

When the appliance is upgraded to gas, an insert should be installed. The metal flue duct will reduce the diameter and make the draft characteristics of the metal flue pipe much more efficient and appropriate for a gas appliance.

Conclusion

Regardless if you are buying or selling a home, it is a significant transaction either way. Buy with confidence and sell with pride by having Regal Home Inspections, LLC conduct your inspection. We look for things that you probably never considered. That’s why we can help you avoid issues and delays in closing when the buyer and seller are of different minds on whom should address inspection item A, B or C. We can help get some of them out of the way for the seller or help the buyer identify issues that may not be obvious.

Regal Home Inspections, LLC starts every inspection with the presentation of a folio of information for the client. That folio includes general information but also includes a written introduction to the inspection. I present an initial overview of the main elements detailed in this article; Laws that govern the inspection process, areas that will be inspected and more. I believe this is unique to the service that Regal Home Inspections, LLC provides.

I would appreciate your comments about this article. Please email your comments to frank07722@gmail.com

About the author. I am a NJ Licensed Home Inspector. I am the owner and Inspector at Regal Home Inspections, LLC. In addition to being a New Jersey Licensed Home Inspector I am also a NJ-DEP certified Radon Measurement Technician and Regal Home Inspections, LLC has also collected samples for lead paint, allergens and mold. We are affiliated with the state’s best labs that perform the sample evaluation and testing. We can also help facilitate the testing of septic system and numerous aspects of oil tank evaluations. This includes oil tank integrity testing, tank locate services and soil samples. We work to ensure that the house you’re buying is sound or that you know of any issues.

Pre-Listing or Seller’s Inspection

Pre-Listing or Seller’s Inspection.

Why is it the right thing to do?

By Frank J. Delle Donne, Licensed Home Inspector

January 9, 2014

About the author.  Frank J. Delle Donne is a NJ Licensed Home Inspector, owner and Senior Inspector at Regal Home Inspections, LLC.  and a member of the New Jersey Association of Licensed Professional Home Inspectors (NJ-ALPHI) & the National Association of Certified Home Inspectors (NACHI).  Frank graduated from Pace University in New York City and he is a 30+ year veteran of the telecommunications industry.  Frank founded Regal Home Inspections, LLC and is building it into the most professional, comprehensive and thorough inspection company in New Jersey leveraging his technical skills as well as his professional sales skills learned during over 3 decades of industrial sales.    Regal Home Inspections, LLC can also test your house for radon having exceeded the NJ requirements to obtain a Radon Measurement Technician certification.  Indoor Air Quality, Mold and Allergens are also tests we can provide for real estate transactions or for the self motivated, concerned homeowner.  We can also facilitate testing of septic systems and oil tanks; tank integrity and soil tests below ground.

Introduction – Preparing to List Your Home

Most homeowners like their homes.  They’ve probably lived in it for a number of years and, for whatever reason, are compelled to sell.  Perhaps it’s to downsize or upgrade.  Perhaps to relocate to a new area, move to a better school district, move back home or away from the in-laws.  Whatever the reason, you have decided to sell your house.  So what’s next?  You contact a Realtor® or a number of agents.  You compare recent sales in your area or, “comps”.  You think about an asking price and perhaps a minimum price and think, “I won’t go below this price or that.”.  You consider the balance on your mortgage, interest rates for a new mortgage and how much new home you can afford to buy.  Your new commute, your new local taxes, and you should consider the condition of your house.  There are lots of things, right?

Perhaps the last point is one that you should give some extra consideration to.  Why?  We all know that it’s the buyer’s market.  A qualified buyer with a no-contingency purchase, good credit and ready to move in is what every seller is looking for and for that purchaser, there are probably numerous options for them in your area, in that school district, with an easier commute, etc.

So how do you attract the buyer to your house?  Well, you could drop the price or initially set the price so low it sells in days.  In my opinion, if you see a house that has a contract for sale within a few days of its listing the price was probably set too low.

Sprucing Up Your Home – Curb Appeal and Neutral Colors

I am no strange to these real estate sales TV shows.  Whether it’s someone flipping a house or a team of experts showing someone how to prepare their home for sale, like them or not, they have a point.  Homes with great curb appeal and those that present well inside will sell faster than a house that looks like it needs significant repairs and improvements.

I don’t think anyone disagrees that a new coat of paint in the rooms and halls, steam cleaning the rugs, lighting a few scented candles or baking a batch of chocolate chip cookies or an apple pie during the open house will help present the house well.  Good work.  Your plan to appeal to the senses seems to have worked.  You get a contract and it goes into and out of attorney review and then the buyer schedules a home inspection.   This is when the items in disrepair and other issues come to the surface quickly surpassing the positive benefit of the coats of paint and aroma of the pies and cookies.  And you start thinking, is the deal going to go south?

Solution

While there are no guarantees in life except death and taxes, you can help minimize the potential for a last minute deal crash by having Regal Home Inspections, LLC perform a Pre-Listing or Seller’s Inspection.   As you may have read in some of the other articles I have written, there are numerous problems that I find that a homeowner isn’t even aware that I will be looking for.  The step on your front porch that measures 9 inches high, the downspout that dumps all the rain water off your roof next to your basement wall then the water enters your basement!  Or the simple electrical outlet problem that becomes a highlighted safety item in my or any inspector’s report.  Even something as simple as having (or not) the service records for your heating system and central air conditioner could result in price negotiations with the buyer at the last minute.  This is particularly important if those appliances are more than 10 – 15 years old.

The solution is to get a Pre-Listing or Seller’s Inspection.  Share that information with prospective buyers.  Perhaps correct as many as possible.  Show the buyer that you are diligent and thorough too.  You can, “Sell with Pride” and you can help them, “Buy with Confidence” as we say here at Regal Home Inspections, LLC.

Even if you don’t lift a finger to correct any of the items a Pre Listing or Seller’s Inspection may identify, you can at least use that information in your Seller’s Disclosure and state that the asking price has been set with these inspection items in mind.  Then when the buyer’s inspector finds the same issues, they are not a surprise to you or the buyer.

As we all know, if you get a buyer to agree to $X for your home and then the Inspector finds numerous safety and major defect items (items that a Pre-Listing or Seller’s Inspection would have found) the buyer is going to demand a reduction in price to fix those items.   You will either lose the sale or reduce the price.  This price concession can be for the water heater that’s perfectly fine but it’s 12 years old or the 100 am circuit breaker panel that many consider inferior for today’s living.

Summary

If the cost of a Pre Listing or Seller’s Inspection is $350 but it saves you $10,000 in last minute price concessions is it worth it?  If the inspection costs $450 but it saves you $5000 in last minute negotiations with the buyer or having to hire a plumber or electrician at premium wages to fix a problem  at the last minute to save the deal, is the $450 worth it?

Of course the Pre Listing or Seller’s Inspection is worth the cost.

I would appreciate your comments about this article.  Please email your comments to frank07722@gmail.com