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Inspection Find of the Week

Each week I will attempt to identify an interesting find from a home inspection conducted the week ending on that week’s Saturday.  I am beginning the posts for the week ending January 19, 2019.  Each line below shows the week that the interesting finding is from, what the general topic is and a link to a page or two explaining what the find is and why it might be of interest. If the week’s inspections are standard and nothing of unusual note, a week (or two) may be skipped.

The weeks are generally from Sunday through Saturday so the date shown is for the Saturday ending the week.

January 19. Transite – A building material that contains asbestos. I’ve seen it used in flue ducts to vent a furnace or water heater. I’ve seen it in waste pipes and in this case, it’s used in the air supply for the HVAC heating/cooling system. Click on this link to access a description of this particular find of the week – Transite2

January 26. Moisture hidden a wall but found with a thermal imaging camera.  Click on this link to access a description of this particular find of the weekMoisture

February 2. The find of the week is a severed joist in the crawl space of a house.  Out of sight, out of mind however, I found it. Click on this link to access a description of this particular find of the week  –  Severed Joist

February 9. The find of the week is Knob and Tube wiring in a 99 year old home.  I’ve seen this in many houses. Some have abandoned remnants and some, as found in this Monmouth County house is still active. The home is 99 years old and the wiring is also likely 99 years old. Time for an electrical system upgrade. I’ve seen KnT wiring in homes inspected in Bergan County, Asbury Park, Neptune and in Red Bank. It’s still all over NJ in homes of the same era; Built circa 1920 – 1930s.  Knob and Tube

February 16. The find of the week is moisture in the hardwood flood in a house with a slab foundation. It is not exactly known what the cause is. However, the NJ home inspection standards of practice do require the inspector to identify the underlying cause of a problem. The issue is found. Using the necessary tools (in this case a moisture meter) it is confirmed. Optionally, I document with photographs – NJ home inspection standards do not require photographs. Include all the information in the report along with recommendations to have the cause identified and repaired.   Floor moisture