Customer Comments: Regal Home Inspections

Clients are now also leaving reviews at Google+.  Please visit REVIEWS .

If you are a client, please review our services.   Click Here  and then follow the on-screen instructions.

The reviews here are typical of the results of a home inspection conducted by Frank and Brian of Regal Home Inspections, LLC. These quotes are taken from a popular online service review website.

“We strive to ensure that every client is as happy with our work.” Frank

Thank you for considering Regal Home Inspections, LLC. Sincerely, Frank & Brian

Chris B.

December 2022

I’ve purchased over 10 homes and the Regal team (Frank and Brian) were by far best, most thorough, organized, professional, and responsive inspection team that I have utilized. Every step of the process (proposal for job, scheduling, execution, report-out, etc.) was clear, timely, and well-done. They completed an extremely comprehensive review of the home and had a detailed report with findings and recommendations back to me with 24 hours. I strongly recommend the Regal team for any/all of your inspection needs.

Erin D.

November 2022

I had a wonderful experience working with Frank and Brian. Both were punctual, professional, and extremely thorough. As a first time home owner, I wanted to be selective who I chose to complete my home inspection and I loved that they were familiar with the area. Frank and Brian surpassed my expectations. The report was extremely detailed. Frank and Brian answered all of my questions and were extremely prompt to respond via email/phone. It is evident they take great pride in their work. I would highly recommend them to others!

Michael P.

August 2022

Frank and his son Brian were extremely professional, thorough and helpful home inspectors. They took the time to explain existing problems, as well as pointing out things that could become problems in the future. The inspection report was incredibly helpful in assessing the priorities that we needed to focus on when fixing up our new home. Our experience with them was top notch and I can’t recommend them highly enough!

Michael B.

December, 2021
Frank and his employees were prompt, professional, and extremely thorough. He personally walked me through pretty much every phase of the inspection and was extremely helpful and informative when I had questions / concerns. Would definitely recommend.

Lynn M.

December, 2021
Frank and his son were a pleasure to work with. They always responded quickly to emails, were on time for the inspection and were very detailed in the inspection. This is the 2nd time I’ve had Frank to do an inspection for us and he was wonderful both times! I give them 10 stars!
Frank and his son Brain were very thorough and explained everything to us as they went through the home. They also supplied us was a very detailed report the next day. I would highly recommend them to anyone looking for a home inspector.

 

We are very pleased with our experience with Regal Home Inspection (Frank). Not only was the inspection scheduled promptly, it was extremely thorough and we had the detailed report, with photos, in our in -box the same day. Frank came to us as a recommendation and we will be sure to pass his info along to others. Very positive experience all around!!!

Kyle T

2020
Had a home inspected by them. Frank and Brian did a great job, very detailed, thorough, and responsive.

Sam B.

Feb 2020
Frank and his team were amazing! They did an extremely thorough inspection and were very professional throughout. As a first time home buyer they provided me a great deal of comfort in the decision I was making. I highly recommend Regal Home Inspection, as I would not use anyone else!!

Older – To emphasize the long term commitment of Regal Home Inspections, LLC to the client.

4/2014 “Better than I could have ever imagined. Great communication and feedback. Frank made me feel complete at ease the entire time. Pleasure to work with.” C.J., Elizabeth, NJ

3/17/2014 “I was not able to be present at the time of inspection but he was very trust worthy and I am glad with my decision of going with him. He was very helpful in the process of buying my condo.” D.T.

Does Your Inspector Use a Combustible Gas Detector?

Does Your Inspector Use a Combustible Gas Detector?

Frank J. Delle Donne & Brian S. Delle Donne

June 14, 2024

 

The New Jersey Home Inspection Statutes and Regulations states that, “All home inspectors and associate home inspectors shall, during the performance of a home inspection, be equipped with the following minimum tools and equipment…11. Combustible gas leak detection equipment…”  We, of course, have always had them in our tool bags. Having them, however, is not good enough. We always use them for homes with natural gas (Or propane) as a fuel type.

 

When in the process of hiring a home inspector, ask them, “Do you ALWAYS use your combustible gas detector?”  We do and you’d be surprised how often we find gas leaks.  In at least 2 brand new houses, gas leaks have been found. More than once there have been hints of gas even before the meter was taken out. A few times outside. If one can smell gas outside it’s a substantial leak.  Once, Frank was going through a crawl space and as I crawled under some pipes the gas odor was detected. The meter then confirmed the leak. But most of the times the gas detector finds the leak.

Here are a few videos that have been taken to document the issue. If I went through my archives there would be dozens of leaks identified. The video links are often included in the report. If I was to guess I’d say that maybe 1 in 10 or so homes inspected have a gas leak somewhere.

 

https://youtu.be/k80rycnAt9A

 

https://youtu.be/C3ZcISNkniE

 

https://youtu.be/do7weE2GlaQ

 

https://youtu.be/0AfZSfCAKxE

 

Home Inspection 120 Day Warranty*

Adding A Home Inspection Warranty

*  120-Day Brochure

January, 2024

Regal Home Inspections, LC strives to provide our home buying clients with the best value, detailed and thorough inspection and comprehensive written report. Between Frank & Brian, the father-son inspection team, we hold 4 different New Jersey State licenses. Both Frank & Brian are, of course, licensed to conduct your home inspection.  Both are also licensed as Radon Measurement Technicians and regularly conduct radon tests as an added service of the home inspection and as a stand-alone test for clients that want to screen their existing home. Frank also holds a NJ DEP Pesticide Applicator license that, technically, would allow him to apply pesticides as a commercial service but he does not. The Pesticide license also allows him to conduct termite (aka Wood Destroying Insect) inspections and prepare the industry recognized, “Termite Report” (aka NPMA-33). Brian is also licensed to conduct Lead Paint testing. This is a specialized license. Occasionally Brian conducts lead paint testing and evaluations associated with a home inspection but most of the inspections he conducts are the landlord required lead paint testing. Landlords are required to have rental homes and apartments inspected for lead. Brian is licensed to do so.

Effective February 1, 2024, Regal Home Inspections, LLC is adding an appliance warranty to our full home inspection offering at no additional cost to the client. This, or our Home Inspection Warranty, is through Complete Appliance Protection, Inc. Their brochure is attached and here’s a link to their web site. Complete Appliance Protection: Best Home Warranty Company (completehomewarranty.com)

Home Inspection Including A 120 Day Warranty

When you call for an inspection, we’ll give you a competitive price for the services you need from us. For projects that include a home inspection the price will also include the Complete Protection ® warranty. *Please be sure to read and understand all the Terms and Conditions on Page 2 of the attached brochure (Above).

For first-time buyers this could be the very thing that they rely on to move forward.

Please feel free to call Brian 732-740-8365 or Frank 908-902-2590 to ask about the warranty, inspections, radon tests, termite inspections or lead paint testing/evaluations.

Certificate of Occupancy Requirements In Toms River NJ

Seller’s Challenges and Your Municipality’s Certificate of Occupancy Requirements Toms River NJ

Hurdles to Selling or Renting Your Home.

By Brian S. Delle Donne

August 31, 2023

NJ Home Inspection License # – 24GI00186800

NJ Radon Measurement Technician License # – MET14070

NJ Lead Paint License – 00751-E

 

Hurdles to Selling or Renting Your Home in Toms River Ocean County, NJ

Certificate of Occupancy Requirements in Toms River NJ
Typical HVAC system

As I’ve told many clients, the Certificate of Occupancy (C of O) requirements vary from one municipality to another. For example, there are 33 municipalities in Ocean County and Toms River Township is one of them. Some municipalities may not require one, but sometimes, like a certificate of occupancy requirement in Toms River, they do.

It’s very important to note that NJ State law is that every seller has to submit an application to their municipality so that a municipal Fire Official can inspect the house for (Presence and operation) smoke detectors, carbon monoxide detectors and a fire extinguisher that is mounted in plain sight. This is State law and required in all municipalities; Townships, Boroughs and Cities.

Toms River Township includes a variety of things to be in order and it’s the responsibility of the seller to comply with these, basic items. Some of them are part of the standard, NJ compliant home inspection but that’s usually done on the buyer’s behalf, not the seller.

Regal Home Inspections, LLC can assist the seller in conducting the HVAC certification for a reasonable fee. The fee is based on the number of HVAC systems the home has. Most of the time a home has one furnace and central AC system. Sometimes a home may have a boiler and baseboards or radiators and a separate central AC system. The inspector will provide you with a quote for based on the type and number of HVAC systems your house has. The base price for a single HVAC system (e.g. One furnace with a central AC system) the price to provide you with the Heat Certification is $175.00.

New Toms River CO Ordinance Causing Headache for Homeowners – Lakewood News Network (lnnnews.com)

“This requirement can be satisfied by an HVAC contractor, a recent service document that indicates the unit’s operability or a NJ licensed home inspector’s certificate indicating the heat system’s operability. If the home has an oil tank, an oil tank certificate is needed, and a chimney certificate as well- all from licensed professionals in these fields. This is all in addition to other restrictions as well.”

From – Township of Toms River, NJ Continued Use and Occupancy of Residential DwellingsSearch: § 253-3 Inspection criteria. (ecode360.com)

SS 253.3 Inspection Criteria To pass inspection and receive and MCCUO, the subject dwelling must meet the following criteria:

 

(1) No open or unresolved building, zoning, housing, code enforcement, or engineering conditions, violations, or permits.

(2) Utilities must be operational.

(3) Property description is consistent with tax records.

(4) Furnace/boiler certification provided by a licensed HVAC contractor.

(5) For those properties serviced by well water, a clear well certificate issued in accordance with state law.

(6) Fireplace/chimney certification for wood/coal burning stoves.

(7) Certification from a licensed electrician that any pools, out-buildings, or other accessories or amenities serviced by high-voltage electricity are properly grounded and bonded.

(8) Properly certified heating oil tanks.

(9) The absence of substantive property maintenance code violations.

(10) Properly sized and visible house numbers.

(11) Walkways, including sidewalks and driveway aprons, free of tripping hazards.

(12) Graspable handrails and guardrails on staircases with four rises or more and decks/landings 30 inches above grade.

(13) All exterior receptacles GFCI-protected.

(14) Properly maintained and structurally sound fences and retaining walls.

(15) Conforming safety barriers for pools.

(16) Interior, thumb-knob door-locking mechanisms for primary means of egress.

(17) Suitable means of egress for all bedrooms, including properly functioning windows.

(18) Bathroom privacy.

(19) GFCI-protection for electrical receptacles within six feet of a water source.

(20) Properly functioning hot and cold water mechanisms in kitchen and bathrooms.

(21) No signs of active water leaks.

(22) Secure and intact high-voltage electric wiring, with no open splices or permanently mounted extension cords.

(23) Dryer vents with exterior discharge and approved tubing.

Toms River Certification Forms Including Heat

About Regal Home Inspections, LLC.

Regal Home Inspection is a family owned and operated business, a father and son team; Frank and Brian. We live in Ocean County and Monmouth County but we’ve performed inspection in Mercer, Somerset, Union and other counties as well. Founded in 2013 the company has conducted nearly 4000 inspections and the vast majority have been in Monmouth, Ocean and Middlesex counties. Frank and Brian are trained and licensed to conduct home inspections in New Jersey. They are both also certified to conduct radon tests in homes and Frank is also certified to conduct radon tests in non-residential buildings as well as schools and day-care centers.  Frank is certified to conduct inspections for wood destroying insects (NJ DEP 7B certification) and Brian is licensed to inspect and test for lead paint.

Many of the items listed above, and required by Toms River Township are part of our standard home inspection. That’s why we encourage sellers to have a, “Seller’s Inspection” before you list your home!

For a free quote specific to your Heat Certification needs, or for any of our other home inspection services please call Brian at 732-740-8365.

Other services include:

Full, NJ State Compliant Home Inspections

Termite Inspections

Radon Testing

Lead Paint Testing

Certified to Test for Radon in Schools and Large Buildings!

Radon Testing Radon Measurement Servicesradon inspector brick ocean county nj
Brick Ocean County NJ

NJ DEP Certification MET13186

Effective December 3, 2022, the NJ DEP’s Radon Division adopted new laws for Radon Measurement Technicians that conduct tests to determine the level of radon in the air. The protocols for conducting the measurement of radon in the air follow the standards for measurement set forth by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and the American Association of Radon Scientists and Technologists (AARST) in their manual, Protocol for Conducting Measurements of Radon and Radon Decay Products in Schools and Large Buildings.

Homes Radon Inspector | Buildings Radon Inspector 

Frank J. Delle Donne of Regal Home Inspections, LLC is certified by the NJ DEP to conduct radon measurements in Single Family Homes (A separate AARST protocol than the one noted above) and for Large Buildings and Schools; Preschools, childcare centers, early learning centers. He’s ready to conduct your, important radon measurements.

Why is this important? First, it’s the law. Additionally, radon is the leading cause of lung cancer for non-smokers and there are some links between radon and pediatric leukemia.  Radon is predicted to cause over 21000 lung cancer deaths per year.

New Jersey law, Title 30 Section 30:5B-5.2 addresses Radon testing in childcare centers. It requires that the, “…owner of any building in which a child care center…is located shall test or cause to be tested the space in the building in which the childcare center is located for the presence of radon gas and radon progeny. The test shall be conducted at least once every five years.”

Get A Free Quote For Radon Testing | Free Radon Measurement

For a free evaluation of your facility and a free quote to conduct the measurements (Following the AARST protocols) please call. The evaluation of your facility will require a walk-through of the building including any levels below such as basements.

In Monmouth County, for example, there are a number of townships and/or boroughs classified by the NJ DEP as being, “High Radon Potential” areas. These include Little Silver, Shrewsbury Borough, Holmdel, Marlboro, Freehold and Colts Neck for instance. It’s the law that all daycare centers be tested and should not be delayed, particularly in high radon areas.

Frank can be reached at 908 902 2590 or via email at frank07722@gmail.com

It’s a good idea to have your home tested for radon as well.

 

Radon Testing Monmouth County NJ

 

Rarely Considered Health Effects of Radon

 

 

 

Using Carbon Dioxide (CO2) As An Indicator Of Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) Issues

Evaluating The Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Levels Inside a Home as a Clue For Mold

July 24, 2023

Introduction: CO2 Levels Inside A Home

Regal Home Inspections, LLC has always been as diligent as possible with regard to meeting and often exceeding the letter and spirit of the NJ Home Inspection Standards of Practice (The Law). We’ve received many compliments on the comprehensive nature of our inspections and quality of our reports. The Law states what must be done, what is excluded and leaves open to individual inspection companies to expand into ancillary services. As an example, both of the home inspection team at Regal Home Inspections is, of course, licensed in NJ to conduct the home inspection. They are also both certified by the NJ DEP as Radon Measurement Technicians. Frank is also licensed by the NJ DEP as a Pesticide Applicator which allows him to conduct termite inspections and prepare the industry recognized Termite Report (NPMA-33).  Brian is also licensed by various State entities to perform lead paint evaluations (Lead Safe inspections) and collect dust samples to check for lead paint dust.

As of this writing, New Jersey does not have any license requirements for mold testing, sewer scopes, oil tank sweeps, etc. and we opt to allow others address those. We will, however, evaluate the Carbon Dioxide (CO2) levels inside a home as a clue for mold. More on this below.

A conversation about, “Looking for mold” often takes place with prospective clients and we’re very consistent to say, “We don’t look for mold”.  Mold can be in dozens of places inside a home; Under carpets, inside walls, behind bathroom vanities, etc.  We feel that if you tell someone that, “Yes, we look for mold” then if you look in 100 places and don’t see any it’s possible that after the client moves in and changes the carpets and there’s mold under the padding for a carpet they may complain because you said, “Yes, we look for mold” (Which of course we do not).

Taking air samples for mold is one way of determining if high levels of mold exist inside a home but it’s costly. A special vacuum pump is used to collect air samples. Multiple air samples are taken then sent to a lab for evaluation. The lab’s evaluation includes identifying the types of mold spores collected and the amount. Some mold is expected. Elevated levels are not. Again, each air sample costs the consumer about $125.00 and usually, at least 3 are needed (One of which is a control sample taken outside the home being tested). There may be as many as 6 or more in many instances and the cost can easily approach $1000 just to, see if there’s mold.

Solution CO2 Levels Inside A Home

CO2 meter in calibration mode.
CO2 detector mounted on a tripod. Indoor measurement is 796ppm. Like many homes, the windows and doors have been kept closed for weeks while the AC has been running. Same room after the windows were opened measured CO2 @ 554ppm.“See” if there’s mold.

We have recently learned about another, less expensive way to predict if a home has mold. In researching the new methodology we learned that it has been in use with the US Department of Agriculture for years (Since about 2009).

For the home buyer, it’s predictive. If this new methodology provides normal results then the research indicates that there aren’t elevated levels of mold growth inside a home.  However, if the methodology has different results, that indicates that high levels of mold exist THEN, further evaluation is required by a mold specialist.

The predictive methodology is measuring the Carbon Dioxide (CO2) in the air inside a house, room, basement, etc.  Research that we’ve reviewed state that normal outside CO2 levels are about 400 parts per million (ppm). If the levels of CO2 spike, 3000 or more ppm, this is a red flag that there may be high levels of mold in the house. You see, according to a USDA researcher, ”monitoring CO2 levels might provide more accurate results to detect if mold is growing.  Monitoring mold by measuring CO2 : USDA ARS

The researcher says that,As mold grows it gives off carbon dioxide. Therefore, if there is a CO2 spike, there is likely an increase of mold activity.”

From Facts About Indoor Mold – RadGreen

“Seeing a spike in CO2 levels could show severe mold growth. Standard carbon dioxide runs about 400 parts per million (ppm), and if the sensor reads more than 10,000 ppm, that could mean severe mold activity, and then 2,000 to 3,000 ppm could mean some mold activity.”

“Indoor mold is the mold that causes problems. Mold growth can cause damage to buildings and furnishings. To reduce mold growth in an indoor space, controlling the humidity levels is very important. Keeping humidity levels between 30-60% can reduce the amount of moisture in the air to keep mold growth low.(2) Ventilating the space is another way to reduce mold growth in indoor spaces. Inspecting your indoor space is vital to ensure that the indoor environment stays healthy. Responding quickly to leaks and spills and cleaning them is essential to prevent growth in those areas.”

Regal Home Inspections, LLC, is undergoing the implementation of the use of carbon dioxide (CO2) detectors during the course of our home inspections. Training for Indoor Air Quality was just completed. Just like the termite inspection, radon test or lead paint, it will be another ancillary service allowed by the home inspection Law.  During the course of a home inspection a CO2 detector will be used in different areas of the house. For example, we’ll check the CO2 levels in the basement, kitchen area and bedroom area. If the CO2 is in the 600ppm range then, as the reference material indicates, that’s a level that is expected inside. If it’s elevated from that and spikes to 2000ppm – 10,000ppm then the client will be advised to get a mold specialist for further testing. This service will be offered in conjunction with our standard home inspections at a reasonable price. It will also be offered as a standalone service.

“Seeing a spike in CO2 levels could show severe mold growth. Standard carbon dioxide runs about 400 parts per million (ppm) [outside], and if the sensor reads more than 10,000 ppm, that could mean severe mold activity, and then 2,000 to 3,000 ppm could mean some mold activity.”

“Indoor mold is the mold that causes problems. Mold growth can cause damage to buildings and furnishings. To reduce mold growth in an indoor space, controlling the humidity levels is very important. Keeping humidity levels between 30-60% (20% – 50% is a tighter range which is beneficial) can reduce the amount of moisture in the air to keep mold growth low.  Ventilating the space is another way to reduce mold growth in indoor spaces. Inspecting your indoor space is vital to ensure that the indoor environment stays healthy. Responding quickly to leaks and spills and cleaning them is essential to prevent growth in those areas.”

Regal Home Inspections, LLC, is undergoing the implementation of the use of carbon dioxide (CO2) detectors during the course of our home inspections. Just like the termite inspection, radon test or lead paint, it will be another ancillary service allowed by the home inspection Law.  During the course of a home inspection the CO2 detector will be used in different areas of the house. For example, we’ll check the CO2 levels in the basement, kitchen area and bedroom area. If the CO2 is in the 500ppm to 600ppm range then, as the reference material indicates, that’s a level that is expected. If it’s elevated from that and spikes then the client will be advised to get a mold specialist for further testing. This service will be offered in conjunction with our standard home inspections at a reasonable price. It will also be offered as a standalone service.

 

Pricing:                                                       With a Home Inspection         Stand-alone

Radon                                                          $50 – $100                             Minimum $175

Termite                                                         $50 – $100                            Minimum $195

Lead Paint                                                     Varies*                                 Varies*

Carbon Dioxide (CO2)  Measurement         $150                                       $350+

 

*- Different municipalities have different requirements. Some allow a visual, “Lead Safe” inspection and others require swabs be taken in every area where children are likely to spend time; Bedrooms, playrooms, Living rooms, etc.

 

 

Inspecting Older Homes (100+ years old) In NJ

What To Expect When Inspecting Older* Homes In NJ

*We’re are defining, “old” as 100 year old and older.

February 1, 2023

Inspecting Older Homes Bick Ocean County NJ
The white, left side of this home was built in the 1800s. The right-side (Stone wall section) dates back to 1740.

By Brian S. Delle Donne & Frank J. Delle Donne

This is Regal Home Inspections’ 10th year in operation. Over these years we’ve inspected new homes and many homes built in the 1900s. We’ve also had the challenge of inspecting older homes built in the 1800s and even a handful built in the 1700s. The first old home I inspected was on Queen Rd. in Stockton, NJ. It was inspected on January 5, 2015. There were two sections in the home. The, “newer” section was built in the 1800s. The original home was built in 1740. Can you imagine, that’s 36 years BEFORE the signing of the Declaration of Independence!!!  In 2019 we inspected a house in Middletown, NJ that was built circa 1765. We’ve seen some pretty interesting things. For example, since the beams and timber used to build the house were made from trees cut down on the property or nearby, you can still see the chisel marks from the people that shaped the wood over 200 years earlier. In 2 houses that we’ve inspected, and clearly visible in the attic, the roof rafters had Roman numerals chiseled into them. So the two raters that meet at the ridge of the house each have the Roman numerals I, II, III, IV, etc. My prediction is, and I’m very confident that this is correct, because they used mortise and tenon construction, those rafters were shaped on the ground and then like puzzle pieces, carried or lifted to the roof area and constructed. I goes with I. IV matches to IV, etc. Pretty neat I think.

But what inspired me to write this piece today was an inspection that Brian and I did this past weekend. Literally, within the past 11 days we inspected 2 houses built in 1910. One in Matawan and one in Wall Township. We also inspected a house built in 1927 in Carteret over the past week.  If you’re thinking about purchasing an old house, be sure to have it inspected. This applies for newer homes as well but NEVER waive your inspection on an older home.  This blog points out a few findings that are often seen in older homes and as a buyer, you must be aware of going into the deal.  Now I know the saying is that the 3 most important things in a home purchase are location, location and location, but the older the home the bigger the potential for it to be a money pit. If you have the tolerance for that going in and you have the money for some things you may not have considered then great, go for it. But if you’re extending yourself a little further than you’d like and may not have a large amount of cash to reverse some of the issues that may exist, be aware, get an inspection from a reputable company and one that’s familiar with these things.

  • In older homes (200+ YO) if you’re lucky the foundation exists and maybe it’s stones. Stones that were sourced from the area and used to build the foundation. Sometimes the issue isn’t the stones themselves but the mortar that holds them together. In older homes (Even those built up to the early 1900s), the mortar that holds the stones (And brick in 100 YO homes) turns to sand. Think of the mortar as the glue that holds the stones, brick or more modern concrete blocks together. If the mortar loses its adhesive properties, the stones or brick will become loose. This can cause the foundation walls to move and often bow inward due to the pressure from the dirt outside.
    inspecting older homes foundation in middletown nj
    200+ year old stone foundation. Middletown, NJ.
    inspecting older homes foundation middletown nj
    200+ year old stone foundation. Middletown, NJ.

     

  • The structure also includes the wood; Beams and joists are what are visible in the basement. Rafters are seen in the attic. Beams and joists may be held together with mortise and tenon joints. This is where they cut a tab into the end of the joist and a corresponding hole in the beam. The tab is set into the hole. But as the house ages and may shift, the mortise and tenon joints may separate. With respect to the wood, beams will sag over the decades and cause floors above to not be level. This is very common. Also, 100+ year old wood may have been infested with powder post beetle larvae. These insects hatch and bore small holes in the wood. The way I describe the powder post beetle damage to people is as follows: You know how good wood has fibers in it. The fibers help give the wood strength. Power post beetles change the structure of the wood so it has a composition kind-of similar to chalk. When you break a piece of chalk it just snaps.  The powder post beetle damaged wood may not snap but the intended structure of the wood no longer exists.
inspecting older homes joist nj
This joist is splitting at the tenon. The tenon creates a weak part in the joist. Similar cracks seen in a few of the other photos.
inspecting older homes beams nj
The tenon is pulling away from the mortise that was cut in the beam to support the joist.
inspecting older homes studs nj
This appears to be a stud that goes vertically, up above the floor above. There’s a mortise and tenon as well as a peg that holds the stud in place instead of nails.
inspecting older homes wood cracks foundation nj
Cracks in the wood at the tenon.
inspecting older homes wood foundation nj
Poorly supported mortise and tenon connection.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

inspecting older homes Powder post beetle exit holes nj
Powder post beetle exit holes can be seen here. The holes are about the size of a pin head.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tree trunks being used as structure in a home. A column seen here.
An original, circa 1765, joist seen here. The tree trunk joist has since been reenforced with modern joists. The tree trunk column in the previous photo still stands strong.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is a view of the joists above the 1st floor of the house in the cover photo. From the 1740 section. It’s not an optical illusion. The joists are sagging.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here and the next photo, chisel marks can be seen in joists in the 1740 home. Can you picture the men chiseling the wood into shape to use to build this house? I can.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Can you see the Roman numerals cut into these 2 pieces of wood? This is from an exposed wall in a building in Holmdel, NJ. I also saw similar markings on roof rafters in a very old home in Keyport, NJ. Maybe the same builder?

 

  • Electrical and Lighting. This is a big thing in older homes. 125+ years ago houses may have been illuminated with gas lamps. Pipes were installed in the walls and throughout the house the pipes came out of the wall with a little valve and one could literally light an open gas flame to provide illumination at night. Not a big deal now because they aren’t used but I find it interesting enough to mention.

The real issue with the older home is the wiring circa 1930s called Knob and Tube (KnT). This was found in the house inspected this past weekend. Built 1910 and wired with KnT in that era. This may have been the first house in the neighborhood with electric lighting. Pretty impressive for 1910 but today, insurance companies frown upon KnT. We advise buyers that it must all be removed by a licensed electrician. Obtaining homeowner’s insurance with reasonable premiums may be difficult. As I tell people, insurance companies don’t like risk or you’ll pay for the risky lifestyle; Smokers, parachute jumpers, waterfront/oceanfront properties, etc. Reduce risk and you can reduce costs.

Examples of Knob and Tube wiring seen here and the next photo.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Hazardous materials. Also seen on the 1910 built house this past weekend was asbestos. A known carcinogen. Not only was residual asbestos seen on the steam boiler pipes, small pieces of asbestos (Like duct) were on just about every flat surface in the basement’s utility area. Luckily I carry facemasks (Covid) so I put one on and continued. However, from a home purchase perspective, I’m not sure how expensive it will be to remove all of the asbestos but we all know, “It ain’t (sic) going to the cheap!”
  • Not seen at this past weekend’s house but seen on many others is galvanized steel pipe. Galvanized steel is known for corroding from the inside. It often looks OK from the outside but inside it corrodes and as the rust builds up it reduces the diameter inside the pipe. Flow is restricted. It’s often seen on the water supply pipes as well as drain pipes. If the service pipe from the street is visible and it’s galvanized steel, replacement is a requirement for buyers. Which party pays (Buyers or sellers) is not up to the inspection company to decide but from an inspection perspective…replace it.

These are but a few of the things that we’re highly aware of in older homes.  If you’re considering buying an old home, Regal Home Inspections, LLC is a great option for you. With our formal training and experience with 4 centuries of homes inspected, we’ll provide you with a thorough inspection and comprehensive and informative report.

You can reach either Brian or Frank to ask questions and schedule an inspection.

Brian – 732-740-8365

Frank – 908 902 2590

Can Radon Levels Fluctuate Inside A NJ House?

Do Radon Levels Fluctuate Inside A Typical NJ Home? | Radon Inspector Brick NJ

January 15, 2023

As part of a home inspection done on a home in Red Bank, NJ, Regal Home Inspections, LLC performed a radon test. This occurred about 4 years ago. Following the protocols for the placement of the radon test, it was conducted over a 2, 3 or 4 day period. I don’t recall the exact interval but I know, 100%, that it was done following the testing requirements. Those requirements have a minimum exposure time of 48 hours and as many as 144 hours (e.g. the equivalent of 6 full days). The test came back below the NJ DEP’s, “Action level” of 4.0 pico Curries per liter of air (pCI/L) so there was no further action that needed to be taken. Case closed. A couple of years later I received a call from the young lady that hired us for the Red Bank inspection and radon test because they had decided to sell that home and when the new buyer did their radon test it came back ABOVE 4.0. She asked can that happen and I said, “Yes” it’s possible. That radon levels can fluctuate inside a NJ home.

In 2022, we did another home inspection including a radon test and this time, the test we did in association with the home inspection came back ABOVE 4.0pCi/L. The seller disagreed, hired someone else to do a test and the second test came back below 4.0.  The seller complained but didn’t understand that radon levels can change. She complained that I had done something that made the test come back high.  In my response I stated that, “It’s not like I carry a spray can of radon with me!”  Additionally, I called one of the labs we’re affiliated with to ask a lab specialist if it’s possible for someone to fake a high result. His response was basically if the radon canister was opened, placed upside down on the basement’s concrete floor over a crack in the floor it’s nearly impossible to fake a high reading.  Now please remember that A) Radon is one of the elements on the Periodic Table of the Elements. Just as is Oxygen, Helium, Iron, Gold, Uranium, etc. B) It’s a radioactive element so unless one wants to expose themselves to Alpha radiation, Beta radiation or Gamma radiation, it’s not a good idea to mess around with this stuff.  It’s not like I can sprinkle some radon pixie dust on the test device to fake a high reading. C) The test device has to be placed following recognized protocols which we ALWAYS do.

Dealing With Radon In The NJ Home

Those are two anecdotes that give a little background. For over 31 years my family and I have lived in an area identified by the NJ DEP as a Tier 1 or “High radon potential” area.  During the 10 years or so that I’ve been a home inspector and certified to conduct radon testing I’ve tested my home (In the basement) about 5 times. The results have always been between 2.4 and 2.7pCI/L. Late, last winter (2022) I purchased an active radon monitor. It hangs on the wall like a thermostat. It has an app to by smartphone and constantly measured for radon. Here’s an actual photo of the monitor. It’s manufactu-red by a company called AirThings

Radon Levels | Radon Inspector Brick NJ
AirThings Monitor in my basement.
radon levels app | radon inspector brick nj
Screenshot of the app on my phone on 1/15/2023.

and I urge everyone to have one in your home. Their website is…  Airthings | check it out for the leading radon and indoor air quality monitors. Radon is the leading cause of lung cancer for non-smokers and 2nd only to cigarettes in causing lung cancer. Estimates are that 21,000 people die each year from radon caused lung cancer.

Again, the AirThings monitor was installed in the late winter of 2022. Everything looked good and the monitor read, as I was expecting, in the 2.5pCi/L range. Then Spring arrived. What do many of us do when spring arrives and the outside temperature rises to the mid 60s or 70s? We open all the windows as we did.  About 2 days later the AirThings app on my phone issued an alarm of sorts. MUCH to my surprise, it notified me that the radon level in my basement rose above 4.0!!!  The radon training requires that the test be done while maintaining, “Closed House Conditions.”  That means no open windows, refrain from using the fireplace, etc. Why, because as I experienced 1st hand, opening the windows and airing out the house can cause negative pressure inside the house. Naturally the house wants to equalize the pressure which, in my case, led to drawing radon into the basement.

To rectify the situation, I opened a couple of windows in my basement. Just a crack, mind you, but enough to get some fresh air in. That seemed to do the trick. The average radon level dropped to below 2.0 and often close to 1.0pCi/L.

Then…I turned on a portable heater in my basement. There is some heat from the forced hot air heating system but I was working on a project and painting some cabinet doors that had been removed and placed on a couple of tables in the basement. With the intention of increasing the temperature of the basement to aid in the paint drying a little quicker, I turned on a portable, electric heater and closed the windows.  It did the job I wanted it to do and the basement was nice and warm. However, warm air rises. I believe what happened is that as the warm air rose from the basement it, again, created negative pressure inside the basement. The way the house equalized the pressure was to draw air into the basement from the perimeter drain, etc. That caused the radon to spike to 3.0pCi/L. My project is done. The heater is off and the window is open again and the radon levels are going down.

Key Takeaways | Dealing With Radon In The NJ Home

So, what are the key take aways from this story?

  • Radon levels change. Do not ASSUME that if it tests low once that it will always be low.
  • Test regularly if that’s possible.
  • And test at different times of the year. Since your home’s conditions may change seasonally, test seasonally until you get a good indication how the radon potential changes year-round.

If you have any questions or would like to discuss your specific situation, please call either Brian or Frank at Regal Home Inspections, LLC. We’re both licensed by the NJ DEP to test for radon.  Regal Home Inspections, LLC is licensed to test for radon in single family homes, townhouses, duplex homes, single unit condominiums. Frank is also licensed to perform radon testing in commercial buildings, large and small and schools including preschools and child care centers. Commercial buildings, large and small and schools including preschools and child care centers require a great deal of pre-testing analysis, coordination and fact finding and then strict adherence to the rules set forth by the American Association of Radon Scientists and Technologists (AARST).

Call – Brian @ 732 740 8365 or Frank @ 908 902 2590.

Evolution of Residential Lighting

Regal Home Inspections, LLC recently did an inspection in Matawan, NJ.  The house was over 100 years old and it’s a time capsule for the evolution of residential illumination (Lighting).  In this home were at least 3 distinct technologies seen.  Assuming that they never used candles, the original illumination in the house was gas lights. Pipes were installed that delivered gas to the wall fixture. An open flame illuminated the area. There’s a movie, Gas Light where someone uses a gas light to try to convince another that they’re crazy. The phrase was popularized in 2022 making, “Gaslight” one of the words of the year.

An old gas light fixture. Estimate to be Pre-1920s.

 

This was in the attic of this Matawan house.  Also in the house was Knob & Tube wiring.

Knob and Tube wiring being tested with a voltage detector. The circuit was energized.

The next iteration of residential wiring was knob and tube. Knob and Tube (KnT) wiring was the state-of-the-art around the 1920’s and 1930’s. We’ve found a lot of knob and tube wiring during the nearly 4000 inspections over the years.  In addition to KnT being old, insurance companies don’t like the added risk that it causes. KnT circuits are usually ungrounded. There is no ground wire. That wasn’t much of an issue in the 1930s but 21st century electronics (Computers, modern TVs, etc.) all must be grounded.

KnT circuits have, knobs (Seen in all three photos starting with the one immediately to the left and the two following). The knobs are ceramic and secure the individual wires.

The tubes are also ceramic and are used when the wires have to be installed through wood joists or rafters. If you’re considering buying a home built in the 1940s and earlier, MAKE SURE to have an inspection and use an inspector, like Regal Home Inspections, LLC, that knows what to look for in determining if KnT is or may be present.  If KnT is present, a licensed electrician must evaluate and replace all KnT wiring.

KnT was also seen in the attic. Modern electrical cable has the hot wire, neutral wire and ground inside one jacket (aka casing). KnT, as seen here, has two separate conductors.
KnT is often buried in insulation which is also bad.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Circa the 1940s & 50s, cloth sheathed cables and conductors were used. The wire, in many cases, was tinned-copper. That is a solid copper conductor with a very thin, tin coating.  There’s still a lot of this type & era cable in service. Except for the fact that the insulating materials on the wires can become brittle and break, it’s not an issue like KnT and the aluminum (Next topic).  If there are indications of the insulating materials deteriorating, a licensed electrician must evaluate and repair.

Around the early 1960s more common Non Metallic (NM) cables were used. Key among this era of cables is that all** the conductors were copper. These are still available and the predominant type of electrical cables used. One brand name is ROMEX and the entire category of NM cables are often generically referred to as, “Romex”.  We also see some metal, armor jacketed cables commonly called, “BX”.  BX is still available today and commonly used. Some jurisdictions, such as New York City/Manhattan, still requires BX or metal, armor jacketed cables today.  The NM and BX cables described in this paragraph are STILL the state of the art.  **However, there was a brief period when The Great Garden State allowed solid aluminum conductors in NM cables. From what I’ve been told, toward the end of the Vietnam War some jurisdictions (Including NJ) allowed solid conductor aluminum to be used. From about 1967 through about 1974 it was an option for builders and electricians. My home, built in 1972, had nearly all solid conductor aluminum wire when we moved into it in 1991. If you’re planning to purchase a home build 1967 – 1974, make sure to select an inspector that is aware of the use of aluminum in that era. For a few reasons, aluminum was known to cause fires. Insurance companies don’t like it and it’s expensive to replace.  A technique called, “Pig-tailing” is often used to mitigate the issues with aluminum.  For my home, I decided to replace it all with solid copper, BX cable which is superior to the electrical code for NJ. There is a little, modern, copper, NM cable but the vast majority is copper conductor, BX.

Rarely Considered Health Effects of Radon

Radon – It may be more of a health issue than previously thought.

As we’ve known since about 1986, radon is a residential health issue. In 1986, a worker at a nuclear power plant in Pennsylvania was setting off the radiation detectors on his way into work.  It was determined that the source of his radiation was coming from the radon in his house, not from the nuclear power plant. The federal government bought his house and it has been used as a residential radon lab and study center since. Subsequent to that it was determined that radon gas is the leading cause of lung cancer for non smokers. At some training in March 2021, the instructor pointed out that being in an environment with a radon level of 1pCi/L for 24 hours is equivalent to smoking 2 packs a day.

First, let’s review what is radon and why is it a cause of cancer?  First, radon is a naturally occurring gas, in fact an element. If you remember from High School Chemistry, the Periodic Table of the Elements, radon is an element.  Oxygen, gold, silver, iron are elements as well. However, radon is a radioactive gas. Its origins begin with Uranium 238 in the bedrock in the soil.  A radioactive element spontaneously releases protons, neutrons or electrons. As they do they change their state. Eventually, due to many spontaneous changes and over many, many years, the Uranium 238 eventually becomes radium, another natural element and from Uranium to radium they’ve all been solids stuck in the bedrock.  When radium decays (aka spontaneously changes) it becomes radon which is a gas. For the next 3.8 days, the radon gas rises from the soil and can enter homes or any other building (Schools, businesses, etc.) that have contact with the soil. When radon decays, it A) Releases alpha radiation and B) Turns back into a solid so it basically stops moving. It’s the radiation that is harmful. Radiation in large doses can cause cancer. Any radiation (From the Sun for example causing skin cancer) is dangerous. When you get an X-Ray, for example, there’s some exposure to radiation but since most of us don’t get X-Rays on a regular basis, it’s not harmful. It’s the exposure to radiation that results in the Dental Technician to place the lead lined apron over you so the exposure to the radiation is focused on the area it’s needed.

Second, when radon enters a home it can enter homes with basement, concrete slabs and crawl spaces. While I have not personally done a test resulting in a high radon reading in a house with a crawl space, I have had high radon readings in homes with basements, of course, and with slabs (No basements).

Third, when we inhale radon gas (Red sphere in the diagram below), if it’s not expelled in the next breath, it’s possible that it will go through its radioactive decay while the radon is in our lungs.  Now, just like the sun exposure to our skin, inside our lungs the radon elements are releasing atomic levels of energy in the form of alpha radiation. When it does, it spontaneously changes to lead (Pb), a solid (All following elements are also solids) with a radioactive half life of 26.8 minutes then bam! Another punch of energy but this time it’s beta radiation. Beta radiation is more powerful than alpha radiation and the Pb atom changes to an element called Bismuth (Bi).  In 20 minutes, the Bi spontaneously changes and becomes a nasty element called Polonium (Po). From the site, Polonium-210: Effects, symptoms, and diagnosis (medicalnewstoday.com) there are 25 variations of Po.  Also noted at this site, “Polonium-210 is the deadly poison that was used to kill the former Russian spy, Alexander Litvinenko, in London in 2006. He died of radiation sickness.”

In the radon radio-active-decay process, we see three varieties of Po (Green spheres in the illustration below). Po-218 initially, then Po-214 and eventually Po-210.

All of these characteristics are why the potential to get cancer from radon exists!

That information alone should motivate you to conduct annual radon tests!  But more information was learned at some 2022 training the I attended for my current NJ DEP Radon Measurement Technician licensing. That new information is that there are studies that point to not only lung cancer from radon by childhood leukemia.  Here are a couple of links below that shed some light on that issue.

Environmental radon exposure and childhood leukemia – PubMed (nih.gov)

From the above link, “Among 12 ecological studies, 11 reported a positive association between radon levels and elevated frequency of childhood leukemia, with 8 being significant. In conjunction with ecological studies, several case-control studies on indoor radon exposure and childhood leukemia were examined, and most investigations indicated a weak association with only a few showing significance.”

Childhood leukaemia in areas with different radon levels: a spatial and temporal analysis using GIS | Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health (bmj.com)

For the health and safety of your family, what should you do?

  • Test for radon annually. Conducting short term tests are what’s used for real estate transactions. By radon testing protocols, a real estate, short term test is at a minimum of 48 hours long and up to 6 days. Even if you’ve been in your home for years, test annually.
  • Know your “Radon potential”. The NJ DEP classifies every Borough, Township and City in the state as either, “High Radon Potential”, “Moderate Radon Potential” or “Low Radon Potential”. The classification has to do with the percentage of homes tested vs the probability of having a radon test above 4.0pCI/L. 4.0 is the recognized, “Action Level”. In a real estate transaction, a radon level of 4.0 or higher requires mitigation. 3.9 or below and no further action is required for the sale of the home.

Anecdotally, I live in a NJ DEP classified, “High radon potential” area.  When we moved in radon tests were not common. When I became a home inspector and licensed for radon, I became aware and tested my home. I’ve conducted about 6 tests in my home over the past 9 years and they’ve always come back at around 2.5pCi/l in the basement. We don’t live in the basement but we do exercise there.  I recently purchased a radon detector from a company called Air Things – https://www.airthings.com/

After activating it this past summer, after a week or 10 days of calibration, it provided an reading of that same, 2.3 – 2.7pCI/L range.  About 6 weeks prior to writing this piece, the weather was cool enough to turn off the AC and open windows. After about 10 days of open windows on the floor above the basement, the radon levels in the basement exceeded 4.0pCi/L ! I was shocked but remembered from training over the years that opening windows on the floors above the basement can increase radon levels. Air passing through the house on the 1st level above the basement can cause negative pressure inside the basement. As the pressure inside the basement naturally wants to equalize, it has the potential to draw radon in from the soil and I believe that’s what happened in my home. In addition to not, “airing out” the house, I cracked a few basement windows open (Which I had not previously done).  Our basement is also a walk out so I leave the basement door to the outside open more now than I did before and the radon levels are in the 1.2 – 1.6pCi/L range pretty reliably.

Conclusions:

  • Take radon seriously. For all people, young and old. Help prevent lung cancer and potentially leukemia.
  • Either test for radon regularly or purchase an active radon monitor like the products sold by Air Things.

Final notes: The NJ DEP is implementing new radon measurement protocols effective December 3, 2022. Unfortunately, the new protocols will drive the price of radon testing up.  Currently, a 1200 square foot split level house would require 1 test device in the, “Lowest livable level” (aka basement). The new protocols will require at least four (4) tests in the same house.  If you’d like to have us conduct a radon test for you, prior to December 1, 2022, prices start at $100 (There are other factors that determine the number of tests now but 1 can is often allowable).  After December 1, the prices will definitely be increasing.

Frank J. Delle Donne is a NJ DEP Licensed Radon Measurement Technician. First licensed for radon testing in December 2013. He is co-owner of Regal Home Inspections, LLC along with his son, Brian.

Frank is licensed to do NJ home inspections, NJ DEP Core and 7B termite (Wood destroying insect) inspections and radon testing. Brian is licensed to do NJ home inspections, radon testing and lead paint testing.

 

Flippin’ Flippers

Flippin’ Flippers

by Frank J. Delle Donne  

October, 2022

Flipping houses has become an occupation for some. There are many homes that have been restored and updated by investors and DIYers. Many of them are very nice. However, as home inspectors, we’ve come across a number of flipped houses that fall under the category of what I call “Buyer Beware”. One such example was inspected October, 2022.

Due to some findings at this house, I was motivated to write this article as a word of caution to prospective buyers of flipped houses and a strong word of encouragement to hire a professional, licensed home inspector.  Your due diligence includes the inspection of the house including a termite inspection, sewer scope and tank sweep at least.  Most flipped houses are not occupied when you are thinking of buying it and have been empty for a while. Many flipped homes are old.

The standard, New Jersey home inspection covers structure, roof, electric, plumbing, etc. All very important things. I am also licensed to conduct a termite inspection and both inspectors here at Regal Home Inspections are also licensed to conduct radon tests.  Commencing in the very near future, one inspector at Regal Home Inspections, LLC will also be NJ licensed/certified to perform LEAD PAINT testing as well.

From what I’ve learned, anecdotally, many mortgage companies require a termite inspection. Even if yours does not, it’s very important that you hire a thorough inspector for Wood Destroying Insects (WDI).  WDI usually include termites, carpenter ants and carpenter bees. There are others but these are the three, most common.

While most houses should have a radon test, Monmouth County, for example, has a number of towns that are classified by the NJ DEP as, “High radon potential” areas. A few towns in Middlesex County and Somerset County. No towns in Ocean County are classified as high radon potential areas but we have seen homes with levels of radon that require mitigation. A radon test is important for a home you’re buying and periodic radon tests are important for occupied homes.

Back to the, “Flippin’ Flippers.”

The flip-house we recently did in Monmouth County had a nice looking kitchen and nicely renovated bathrooms and floors, etc. But what exists outside of the obvious is what matters. For this home, the major issues included:

Extensive, structural damage in the basement from termites.

Structural damage due to bad trade-practices in the crawl space and

Very poor implementation of aspects of the roof/plumbing vents and fan venting to the outside.

Termite Damage – Sometimes, termite damage is hard to find. It’s often limited and in a small area. Sometimes the indications are seen outside and sometimes inside. In this case, there was termite damage in a number of floor joists and in the subfloor. The termites rendered a number of joists as worthless for their intended purpose. Consequently, floors were no longer level and the structure of the house was compromised. Of course, following the NJ HI standards of practice, this is a material defect.  I’m going out on a limb and speculate that the flipper didn’t do their own inspection because this would have/should have been found.  In our report to the client we identified the problem, told them why it was important – damages the structure/reduces structural integrity – and advised them on what to do next. In this case it’s getting in an expert to provide a quote to repair and replace all the damaged wood so they can negotiate the purchase price with the flipper and receive some concession.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Structural Damage – While crawl spaces are not places I enjoy going, as I sometimes tell people, “Going into the crawl space was, “worth the price of admission”. In this same, flip-house there were two joists, under a bathroom no less, that had notches and split. These joists are holding up the weight of the tub and toilet and they are now capable of supporting a load that’s only a fraction of the joists’ intended strength.

Joist is poorly notched and now a split is forming from the weak point.
This notch significantly weakens the joist. Furthermore, both of these joists are below a bathroom. There appear to be some sagging in the joist at the notch. That’s understandable.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Roof issue. This is one for the Hall of Shame in my opinion. A sincere, “Thank you” to the flipper for making it so easy to identify.  From the outside of the house there were two elements of the roof that caught my attention. Now please note, the NJ home inspection laws require inspectors have an 11 foot ladder. Following the ladder’s safety instructions, that means I can’t get on a roof that more than, approximately 8 feet off the ground.  I also carry a 22 foot ladder but for this home, that too was not long enough. So, I use the telephoto lens of my camera and zoom into the roof as close as possible.

The first 2 photos below caused some concern when seen from the outside.

 

 

 

 

 

 

When I went into the attic, I could see what was actually done. To give you an idea, my first reaction was to use a descriptive word for the actions of the flipper such as, “egregious”. A quick Google search for the definition of egregious results in, “outstandingly bad; shocking.”  Yes, that’s how I felt. My inspection partner, Brian, told me to edit that out of the report so I did. I substituted it with, “poor craftsmanship” or something similar.  The conditions still are material defects. The conditions were these…

For the pipe boot seen from the outside (Right photo above), the craftsman, inappropriately left the plumbing vent short and inside the attic and stuffed a bathroom fan’s vent together at the bottom of the pipe boot. The boot is absolutely not intended for that configuration. Someone knew they were doing that work incorrectly and in a substandard manner but did it anyway.

 

 

 

 

 

For the first photo from the roof, someone just stuck the open end of a 4 inch diameter, flexible foil vent duct through the roof! That’s basically a 4 inch diameter hole in the roof.  For both of these things, what were they thinking?

Water will enter the vent and collect at the bottom of the duct inside the attic. The potential exists for either the duct to leak onto the ceiling above or the water accumulate so much that it starts draining out of the ceiling fan in the bathroom!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bottom line, these matters were found and properly reported back to the client. There were also other findings that require attention; Electrical, safety and maintenance items (Like clogged and loose gutters).

Bottom line, hire a capable inspection company. Although you have to pay for these things, get the inspection, oil tank sweep, sewer scope, termite inspection, radon test and even a lead paint inspection.  There are also other things that may or may not apply such as pool inspections, Level 2 chimney inspections, etc.  If you have any questions please call Brian Delle Donne at 732 740 8365 or Frank at 908 902 2590.