Radon Testing Monmouth County NJ

Radon Testing: It’s Someone Else’s Problem, Not Mine. Right?

My name is Frank J. Delle Donne, and I am a NJ Licensed Home Inspector.  I am the owner and Senior Inspector at Regal Home Inspections, LLC.  I have been a volunteer Emergency Medical Technician for over 20 years and was a member of the Colts Neck, NJ Board of Health and was Chairman of that Board for 2008 and 2009.    During my studies to become a Home Inspector and earning my NJ Certification to be a Radon Measurement Technician I learned a great deal about Radon and felt compelled to share that information in a manner that is easy to understand and increases awareness.  Every home in New Jersey should be tested for Radon on a regular basis.

 The federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has been leading the effort to make citizens aware of radon and closer to home, the NJ Department of Environmental Protection (NJ-DEP) has been following suit.  Please read our earlier post for general information about radon.   This piece is intended to point out that a radon problem may be closer to home than you think.

Radon: The Basics

A few points that I’d like to repeat from the earlier article is that radon is everywhere and it is naturally occurring.  It is a radioactive gas which means that it transforms spontaneously and in that transformation it releases tiny bursts of energy.  When radon is inhaled in your home (living levels, bedrooms or basement) it is these tiny bursts of energy, occurring inside your lungs, that cause harm.

Radon is a colorless, odorless gas.  Radon IS NOT flammable, toxic or noxious.  It is, however, radioactive and it occurs naturally.  This article will look at the radon potential, as identified by the NJ-DEP, in various parts of the Garden State.   As you can see from the map, NJ is divided into 3 classifications of radon potential; Low (Blue), Moderate (Green) and High (Red).  Let’s look closer.

 What Areas of NJ are of Concern and What Types of structures?

New Jersey Administrative Code N.J.A.C. 5:23-10 (2013), among other things, specifies the construction codes, as they relate to radon mitigation in “E” and “R” Use Groups.  “E” stands for educational and “R” is for some Residential.  The International Building Code (New Jersey Edition) identifies educational as a building that houses 6 or more people for educational purposes through grade 12.  Section 305.1 identifies K-12 and Section 305.2 refers to younger facilities (Pre-K and day care) that may have five or more children 2&1/2 years of age or older.  The same source identifies five different residential types, R-1 through R-5.  These include basically any and all residence structures from single family homes to apartments, dormitories, convents and more.

N.J.A.C. also identifies two other very important aspects (among many other good things).  First, Sub Section 5:23-10.4 states the specific construction techniques that must be followed for E and R construction in Tier 1 areas.  Tier 1 are the High Radon Potential areas shown in red in the previous map.  Before I go to that discussion, let’s finish the discussion on the construction.  Among other important elements, for example, the N.J.A.C. states that, “Basement slabs with interior foundation pipe drains installed shall have a solid, three-inch minimum diameter vent pipe installed in conjunction with this drainage system and be connected to an independent vent stack pipe terminating at an approved location on the exterior of the building.”

This accommodation is to allow for the future installation of a vent fan in order to actively draw air from below the basement slab and out of the house before the sub slab gasses have a chance to seep into the house.  These are referred to sub-soil depressurization systems.

Therefore, new construction in these Tier 1 areas should have the basics for a radon mitigation system installed right from the start.  So then, where are these Tier 1 areas?

NJ Counties and Towns that are Deemed to be Tier 1

As you can see from the map  above the Tier 1 areas are nearly in every part of the state.  From northern Sussex County to southern Cumberland County, high radon readings are possible in many areas.  One thing you might notice is the sandy soils of the areas along the shore and the Pine Barrens are the lowest areas.  As written about in other articles, these sandy soil areas don’t have a lot of the bedrock with uranium as some of the other areas.  Northern Jersey has granite and shale that are ripe for the presence of Uranium 238 which is at the beginning of the radioactive decay process that results in Radon-222.  The N.J.A.C. specifically mentions counties and towns that are Tier 1 areas so if you can’t quite figure out if you live in a red area or a green one, this list should help.

The following is an excerpt from the aforementioned code.

Summary

If you live in one of these areas you live in an area of High Radon Potential.  You should get your home checked regularly.  Even if you have a radon mitigation system it wouldn’t hurt to check annually.  If you do not have a radon mitigation system you should check quarterly for a period of time.  Radon levels can change season to season and month to month.  It would be a good idea to have a baseline of seasonal levels.  If you have young children and you haven’t checked your home for radon it is something that you should do immediately.  When you are dealing with the health of you and your family, the cost to install a mitigation system is reasonable.  It’s a lot less costly compared to dealing with the illnesses that can occur from extended and continued exposure to radon.

Testing is easy and relatively inexpensive.  If you take advantage of Regal Home Inspections’ 2014 special you can save $50 and have a test performed for $100 (regular price is $150).

Conclusion

Radon is a serious health issue but it can be minimized. You need to test now and then every 6 months.  Likely, it cannot be 100%eliminated.  It’s naturally occurring and exists in nature.  It’s not man-made nor can we stop it from existing.  We can, however, minimize its pathways into our homes and help ensure a healthy and safe environment.  It is better to know than to hope.

Please call today to schedule your  radon test for your family.  Discounted prices are valid for tests started by March 31, 2014.  Please mention, “Radon Discount” when you call.  Also, if you need radon consultation, Regal Home Inspections, LLC can help guide you through the testing and mitigation process.  Regal Home Inspections, LLC does not mitigate so we are not motivated to find elevated readings so we can clean them up.  We inspect homes and we are licensed as a Radon Measurement Technician – MET13186.

I would appreciate your comments about this article.  Please email your comments to frank07722@gmail.com.

Customer Comments: Regal Home Inspections

Originally Posted April 21, 2014

Updated October 20, 2014

Clients are now also leaving reviews at Google+.  Please visit REVIEWS .

If you are a client, please review our services.   Click Here  and then click on, “Write a Review”.

The reviews here are typical of the results of a home inspection conducted by Frank J. Delle Donne of Regal Home Inspections, LLC. These quotes are taken from a popular online service review website.

“I strive to ensure that every clients is as happy as the client reviews highlighted here.” Frank

Thank you for considering Regal Home Inspections, LLC

7/22/14 “Frank, from Regal Home Inspections, came to do a home inspection on the house I am trying to buy. In addition, he also coordinated to get someone to do a termite inspection and based on the results of the home inspection, an additional mold inspection was performed by Frank. 

It went great!!! Frank was on time, professional, and really spent time with me explaining everything in the home and what I would see on the inspection report. For someone with no home experience, this was really useful to me for him to take the time and explain things to me in easy terms. Frank provided the report within 36 hours. Overall I was extremely happy with Frank’s work ethic and product. I would recommend him to all that need a home inspection.” M.D. Lincroft, NJ

7/8/14  “Frank from Regal Home Inspections completed a home inspection on the about 40 year old home I plan to purchase.

First, Regal Home replied to my email inquiry within hours. Each time I have called to contacted Regal they have responded within hours. Regal’s prices were competitive. Regal was most professional, prompt and responsive to each request. They provide follow up and re-inspection without charging another fee. What made my experience with Regal outstanding was that it was much more than a home inspection. Frank explained everything he was doing and why. It was an inspection and it also an orientation to my new home. I learned where the fuse box was, where the electric and water shut-offs were. I learned about the heating and A/C and furnace shut off were as well as how to change the air filter. It was educational and also a delightful experience. I recommend Regal without reservation.”  E.C., Middletown, NJ

6/25/14 “The job was done fantastically, Frank is very professional. We couldn’t have been more pleased.” M.A., Colts Neck, NJ

6/13/14 “I contacted 4 home inspectors and Frank was the first and only one to get back to me.  His prices were reasonable and he did the job we paid him to do.” J.P., Piscataway, NJ

5/28/14 “Very thorough and informative”  N.T., Little Silver, NJ

5/28/14 “Frank has done and continues to do an outstanding job as my  home inspector. He was knowledgeable on the laws and codes involved and even though my building is dated 1929, he was able to explain and educate me on how things work.  Frank was extremely thorough, surpassing what I had expected and found issues that I would not have anticipated. Even though the kitchen was recently remodeled he found some electrical issues which, since the kitchen was new, I had just assumed that area would have been the least of my concerns. He enlightened me on inherent characteristics of older masonry walls which put me at ease knowing that my unit and the building is solid and in great historical shape. He showed me where emergency shutoffs are to water and electric in my unit. He also tested the moisture content of my window sealing and sill areas, which is actually higher than it should be. He went above and beyond and has contacted window repair companies for me and I should be getting estimates for the repairs needed, which saves me valuable time in this hectic pre-close time period. I would absolutely recommend Frank for your pre-buying home inspection, he does a great job!” A.B., Asbury Park, NJ

5/20/14 “We would recommend Regal Home Inspections to anyone looking to purchase a home or even people looking for some professional advice on their existing home. We couldn’t have been happier with the service we were given from start to finish. Frank Delle Donne, the owner of the firm, took us through all stages of the process. Regal was flexible to our scheduling needs and was able to offer a full spectrum of inspections services we required. Regal performed a meticulous inspection and Frank took was sure to take us through every aspect of the home providing feedback on how the systems work and any recommendations. The report was delivered within 48 hours and included a listing of even the slightest potential issue, photos of everything, references to building codes, and general suggestions. It was a complete document that not only were we able to use through the home buying process, but as a reference point going forward with future home maintenance. We were very happy that we made the decision to use Regal Home Inspection and would rely on any of their services, if given the chance, in the future.” D.P., Colts Neck, NJ

4/25/14 “A very thorough home inspection that was very professional and helpful for us as future home buyers.  Frank is highly professional and handled every aspect of the inspection with great detail. His report was extremely detailed with photos and recommendations on what should take place after inspection and I would highly recommend his services to any one buying in Bergen county area.” S.W., Ridgewood, NJ

3/2014 “Frank was extremely professional, courteous, informative, knowledgeable, patient & friendly. Not only during the inspection (I tend to be overly inquisitive), but after when I continued to seek his guidance & recommendations for subsequent services (e.g. chimney, termite, structural, radon, etc). I cannot say enough, he truly went above & beyond. HIGHLY recommend Frank!” E.R.

4/2014 “Better than I could have ever imagined. Great communication and feedback. Frank made me feel complete at ease the entire time. Pleasure to work with.” C.J., Elizabeth, NJ

3/17/2014 “I was not able to be present at the time of inspection but he was very trust worthy and I am glad with my decision of going with him. He was very helpful in the process of buying my condo.” D.T.

2/15/2014 “Frank was excellent! He is very professional and did an excellent job on our home inspection! He goes above and beyond to do all that he can to help you in the process. He also performed radon testing and even took lead paint samples for us. His inspection report was very detailed and thorough and included many photos. He always makes himself available for any questions you may have. I highly recommend him for a home inspection. You will not be disappointed!” M.M.

10/2013 “He went through the whole house, including basement and roof very thoroughly. It went well. He walked us through the home and explained about different potential problems.” BH, Old Bridge, NJ

1/2014 “Frank is a wonderful guy. He performed services needed and on time. He was very helpful in helping me find additional men for services I needed. I would definitely use Frank in future inspections.” DA, Millstone, NJ

 

Radon. What does 4pCi/L mean and why is it important?

Radon

What does 4.0pCi/L represent?

By Frank J. Delle Donne, Licensed Home Inspector

January 16, 2014

About the author.  I am a NJ Licensed Home Inspector.  I am the owner and Senior Inspector at Regal Home Inspections, LLC.  I have been a volunteer Emergency Medical Technician for over 20 years and was  a past member of the Colts Neck, NJ Board of Health and was Chairman of that Board for 2008 and 2009.    During my studies to become a Home Inspector and earning my NJ Certification to be a Radon Measurement Technician I learned a great deal about Radon and felt compelled to share that information in a manner that is easy to understand and increases awareness.  Every home in New Jersey should be tested for Radon on a regular basis.  Regal Home Inspections, LLC is having a New Year 2014 SPECIAL on Radon testing.  These discounted prices are good through February 28, 2014.  Please call now to schedule your Radon test.

The federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has been leading the effort to make citizens aware of radon and closer to home, the NJ Department of Environmental Protection (NJ-DEP) has been following suit.  Please read our earlier post for general information about radon.   This piece is intended to explain the measured results; When is it an issue and when is it not?

Background

A few points that I’d like to repeat from the earlier article is that radon is everywhere and it is naturally occurring.  It is a radioactive gas which means that it transforms spontaneously and in that transformation it releases tiny bursts of energy.  It is these tiny bursts of energy that cause harm.

Radon, like other radioactive materials, are measured in pCi/L.  This stands for pico Curies per liter of air.  A “pico Curie” is one-trillionths of a Curie.  A Curie is equivalent to 37 Billion radioactive disintegrations per second.  Therefore one pico-Curie works out to 2.2 radioactive disintegrations per minute (dpm) in a liter of air.  A “Curie” is of course named after Marie Curie who lived in the late 1800s to the 1930s.

Action Level

The EPA (and NJ-DEP) refers to 4.0pCi/L as measured over a minimum of 48 hours as the Action Level for radon mitigation.  This applies uniformly to real estate transactions and for the self motivated homeowner who tests for radon, they too should mitigate at this, measured level.

As mentioned in the previous article, the radioactive disintegrations take on three different forms.  There is Alpha radiation, Beta radiation and Gamma radiation.  The result of a, “disintegration” is a new element (Polonium, Lead, Bismuth or Radon) but the process that the atoms change also releases energy in Alpha, Beta or Gamma form.

At 2.22 dpm per pico Curie at 4pCi/L (assuming each one of your lungs holds a liter of air) that’s 16.88 (8.44 per lung) radioactive disintegrations that are occurring inside your lungs!  While these releases of energy are extremely tiny, they have the potential to damage cells and DNA.  This can lead to the events that begin the formation of mutant or cancerous cells.

So is 3.5pCi/L that much better?  Not really but for the real estate transaction, a radon test measurement that reads 4.0pCi/L will result in a letter from the buyer’s attorney to the seller/seller’s attorney stating that the seller must mitigate the radon and provide new test results that show the level is, post mitigation, less than 4.0pCi/L.

At or above 4.0pCi/L and a letter is coming.  A reading of just below 4.0pCi/L may ask for a second test where the two tests might be averaged.  Rest assured that at or above 4.0pCi/L and the seller will be calling a radon mitigation company.

Mitigation

Radon mitigation comprises of a system, usually a vent, that will reduce the measured radon inside at the lowest, “livable” area.

A very common type of mitigation system is a sub soil depressurization system.  In this method, a pipe is placed below the concrete basement floor.  That pipe (usually a 4” PVC pipe) is routed to the outdoor and a fan is placed to draw the air (and radon) from below the basement floor and vent it to the outdoors before it enters the house.  With this system the basement floor has to be sealed which means that sump pits are sealed and French drains are sealed.   Also, any cracks or other basement floor penetrations must also be sealed for the sub soil depressurization system to be most effective.

radon-mitigation-system-3
The white pipe is the radon mitigation system pulling air and radon from below the basement floor, up and outside before the radon gas enters the house. The area of the vent system that bulges out is a fan. The fan runs constantly.

The cost for such a system can be as low as $1500 but based upon many factors could be higher.   After the system is installed and activated, it should be left operation AT ALL TIMES.  It should be operating for at least 12 hours to allow “Dynamic Equilibrium” to occur.  This is a fancy way for saying that the positive effects of the new mitigation system should be set in place after 12 hours.  After this period of time a post-mitigation test must be done to ensure that the mitigation steps were successful.  In some cases secondary or tertiary mitigation steps must be taken to achieve a reading below 4.0pCi/l.  If for example your initial test reading was 8.0pCi/l and the first mitigation effort reduced the radon by 25%, Post-Mitigation test #1 may indicate a 25% drop but that’s still 6.0pCi/L.  A second mitigation system may have to be added which may reduce the radon by another 25%.  6.0pCi/L less 25% is only a 1.5pCi/L reduction so you STILL may be above 4.0pCi/L.  A third mitigation system may be necessary to finally get you below 4.0pCi/L.

Conclusion

Radon is a serious health issue but it can be minimized.  Likely, it cannot be eliminated.  It’s naturally occurring and exists in nature.  It’s not man-made nor can we stop it from existing.  We can, however, minimize its pathways into our homes and help ensure a healthy and safe environment.

Please call today to schedule your  radon test for your family.  Discounted prices are valid for tests started by February 28, 2014.  Please mention, “Radon Discount” when you call.  Also, if you need radon consultation, Regal Home Inspections, LLC can help guide you through the testing and mitigation process.

I would appreciate your comments about this article.  Please email your comments to frank07722@gmail.com .

Radon – What is it? TEST NOW!

 

Radon 

What is it and why is it important to consider?

By Frank J. Delle Donne, Licensed Home Inspector

December 15, 2013

About the author.  I am a NJ Licensed Home Inspector.  I am the owner and Senior Inspector at Regal Home Inspections, LLC.  I have been a volunteer Emergency Medical Technician for over 20 years and was  a past member of the Colts Neck, NJ Board of Health and was Chairman of that Board for 2008 and 2009.    During my studies to become a Home Inspector and earning my NJ Certification to be a Radon Measurement Technician I learned a great deal about Radon and felt compelled to share that information in a manner that is easy to understand and increases awareness.  Every home in New Jersey should be tested for Radon on a regular basis.  Regal Home Inspections, LLC is having a year end 2013 and a New Year 2014 SPECIAL on Radon testing.  These discounted prices are good through January 31, 2014.  Please call now to schedule your Radon test.

It is likely that every adult has heard of Radon and may have an idea about what it is.  This report is intended to shed some additional light on Radon and hopefully motivate and inspire you to have your house tested for Radon concentration levels. You maintain your smoke alarms and check your car’s brakes regularly because it’s the right thing to do.  Prudent, right?  It protects your safety, doesn’t it?  Well after you read this you should be similarly motivated to call us today to have your home tested for Radon.

So let’s begin with a simple question; What is Radon?  Radon is a gas.  It is odorless and colorless and can’t be detected by human senses.  Uranium and Radium precede Radon in the spontaneous transformation  chain.  Uranium and Radium are solids that exist underground.  As they go through radioactive decay the next link on the chain is Radon, now a radioactive gas.  Elements that are radioactive spontaneously transform at the atomic level.  One radioactive elements spontaneously releases energy and becomes another element and so on.  Hence the use of the word, “Chain”.

There are other gasses that we’re aware of and concerned about, aren’t there?  There’s CO or carbon monoxide.  There’s natural gas like the gas we use to heat our homes and cook with.  We all know that these two gasses, CO and natural gas can be dangerous and even lethal.  CO can kill if breathed for minutes and natural gas can kill if it seeps into the house and then explodes.  Remember the final scene in the movie, Shooter?  Ka-Boom!

Except for all being gasses however, the difference between Radon and CO and natural gas are very different.  First, Radon is naturally occurring and seeps up from below ground.  It is not flammable so it will not explode and it will not kill you, like CO will, if breathed in for minutes.  No, Radon can kill in a different way.

In New Jersey the state is divided into 3 Tiers.  High Radon Potential, Moderate and Low.  The preceding map gives you an idea of where these areas are and if you are in a High or Moderate Radon Potential area YOU SHOULD get your home tested annually or even twice a year.

Why is regular testing important?  Well it’s important because of how Radon creates health problems and the type of health problem it creates.  Also because there are a number of environmental factors that may slow or hasten the entry of Radon into your home.  A good reading or measurement in the spring does not guarantee a good reading or measurement in the winter.  Misunderstanding or relying on your one-time results could be harmful. 

Radon is a radioactive gas.  This means that Radon, as a gas will spontaneously transform creating a chain reaction of sorts.  Radon will go through radioactive decay and change into Polonium-218.   In turn Polonium-218 will spontaneously go through its radioactive decay and change in to Lead-214.  Lead-214 will in turn transform into Bismuth-214 and then into Polonium-214.  This is almost the same as Polonium 218 but not exactly.  Polonium-214 will go through its radioactive decay and become Lead-210.  These elements following Radon are referred to as Radon Decay Products (RDP), Radon Daughters or Radon Progeny.   

An atomic primer: Most atoms have the same number of Protons and Neutrons.  An element’s “Atomic Number” is the number of Protons; Hydrogen has 1 Proton so it’s atomic number is 1.  Radon has 86 Protons so its atomic number is 86.  When one calculates an atom’s Atomic Mass we add the Protons and Neutrons.  Since most atoms have the same number of Protons and Neutrons, “usually” the atomic mass is twice the Protons.  Hydrogen’s atomic mass is 2; 1 Proton and 1 Neutron.  Helium has an atomic mass of 4; 2 Protons and 2 Neutrons.

A different type of atom is an Isotope.  Isotopes are different because they have a different number of Protons and Neutrons.  Since Radon’s atomic number is 86, Radon-222 (Rn-222) means that there are 136 Neutrons; 86+136=222.  Earlier I mentioned Polonium-218 (Po-218) and Polonium-214 (Po-214).  Both Poloniums have 84 Protons but since both Po-218 and Po-214 are isotopes they have different numbers of neutrons.  Po-218 has 134 Neutrons and Po-214 has 130.

So Radon is a gas and if it’s in the air you will breathe it in.  Regardless of if the Radon is in your lungs or in the air, it will go through its radioactive decay cycle.  The issues are many.  First Polonium, Bismuth and Lead are all solids.  Yes, the gas Radon becomes a solid.  So these particles now will stick to your lungs and settle.  Second, when these radioactive decays occur the decay process releases energy.  Very, very, very small amounts of energy but when these atoms are in your lungs, this energy has the potential to do cellular level and DNA level harm.   So what’s the big deal about, “energy”?  Well if we refer to the energy in its proper terms then maybe you will start to understand the issue.  There are actually three forms of energy released during the radioactive decay processes mentioned a moment ago.  Each element does not release all three types of energy but most release two of the three.  Those energy forms are ALPHA RADIATION, BETA RADIATION AND GAMMA RADIATION.  Now do they sound harmful?  In Alpha decay the atom (Radon-222, Polonium-218 or Polonium-214 will spontaneously release 2 neutrons and 2 protons.  These equate to an atomic mass of 4 (Helium) therefore reducing the atomic mass of each atom by four.  Bismuth and Lead decay releasing Beta and Gamma radiation.  In Beta radiation an electron is released and a Neutron is changed to a Proton.  In Gamma radiation energy in the form of a photon is released.  At the cellular level and DNA level these particles of energy, Alpha, Beta and Gamma, are causing destruction and this is why they are harmful.  This damage can start a chain reaction leading to cancer.  Ionizing radiation has the power and energy to cause electrons in nearby atoms to escape their natural orbit.

It’s interesting to consider each element’s half life because this will start to give you an idea of what’s going on with Radon and Radon decay products.  Radon has a half life of 3.8 days.  This means that half the Radon will go through its spontaneous transformation in 3.8 days.  Energy is released.  The result is Polonium-218.  It has a half life of 3 minutes.  Half is now Lead-218 and it has a half life of 27 minutes.  Half of it releases its Beta and Gamma radiation and now we have Bismuth-218 half of which decays in 20 minutes and also releases Beta and Gamma radiation and becomes Polonium-218.  Polonium-218 has a half life of 160micro seconds (very fast) and releases Alpha and Gamma Radiation.  Now multiply the original Radon atom by millions and you can see how the numbers, and damage can add up. 

Again, it’s important to note that the levels of the energy or radiation are very, very, very, very small.  But when the energy is being released hour after hour, day after day and it’s occurring inside your delicate lung tissue you can see why Radon and the Radon Decay Products (RDPs) are the second leading cause of lung cancer behind smoking.   If you never (never, ever, ever) smoked you have a 7 in 1000 chance of getting lung cancer from Radon if your exposure is at the EPA’s Action Level (of 4pCi/L).  If you were a smoker (EPA refers to “Ever Smoked”) you have a 62 in 1000 chance of getting lung cancer if your exposure is at the EPA’s Action Level.  If your exposure is higher than 4pCi/l your chances of getting lung cancer in both smoked and never smoked goes up. 

So you had your house tested once and it had a good reading.  So you’re OK, right?  WRONG!!!  There are many factors that go into Radon penetration in a home.   First, was the house tested under proper, “Closed House” conditions?  What was the weather outside?  Was it winter or summer?  All these things, and many others, can impact your Radon measurement.  This is why it’s good to test regularly.  If a test is made and it’s high, take another test.   If you last test was in the winter, test again in the summer and vice-versa.  I had one client that had their house tested weeks apart and one reading was 4.8pCi/L and the other was 1.1pCi/L.  The point is test frequently as financially possible.  If you’ve just moved into a new house and it tested well, you will do yourself a favor if you test monthly or every other month for the first year.  Test frequently particularly if you have a young family and plan on being in the home for a long time.  Imagine a wheel-of-chance like you see at an amusement park.  The wheel is divided into 52 sections.  Each section represents one calendar week.  If you test once, you will not be capturing a representative sample of your home’s radon potential.  Barometric pressure, wind speed and wind direction, use of a fireplace and many, many other factors can affect your Radon test reading.  Some days and weeks promote Radon infiltration into your house and some do not.  It’s like spinning the wheel.  Sometimes your number comes up and sometimes it doesn’t.   However, when you spin the wheel you are not risking your health. 

Unlike CO and natural gas, Radon kills slowly.  So my recommendation is to call Regal Home Inspections, LLC now.  Let’s get you scheduled for a Radon test and then on a regular schedule for periodic testing.  If your test results are good that’s good for this, “snap-shot” but it does not guarantee that the next test will also be good.  If the test is high, we can re-test to confirm the findings.  If we get multiple reading above the EPA’s Action Level then you should install a Radon Mitigation System.  Regal Home Inspections DOES NOT install Radon Mitigation Systems.  So we’re NOT looking to find a problem so we can sell you on a more expensive product or service.  We are a Certified Radon Test Measurement company.  We will facilitate the test and work with a reputable lab that will analyze the test canisters and provide the results. I can help you interpret the results and continue to provide you with peace-of-mind with regular testing with or without mitigation.

Please call today to schedule your  radon test for your family.  Discounted prices are valid for tests started by January 31, 2014.

I would appreciate your comments about this article.  Please email your comments to frank07722@gmail.com